Graduate Courses

FALL COURSE ENROLMENT BEGINS AUGUST 2nd, 2017

The complete list of ALL ELITE (APS) graduate courses is here

Students who wish to enrol in 500-level courses are encouraged to do so as early as possible as seats are limited.

Fall 2017 1000-level graduate courses begin the week of September 11 unless otherwise indicated. 500-level courses, and 1000-level courses associated with a 400-level course, begins the week of September 4.

COURSE ADD/DROP DEADLINES:  2017 MIE course ADD and DROP dates are listed here.  For APS Summer courses, please follow deadline dates per ELITE's schedule as noted on the 'Admin. Info' section of each course.

For All Reading Course (MIE 2002H, 2003H, 2004, 2005H) and M.Eng. Project (MIE 8888Y):

     ► ADD and DROP dates are 3 days before the posted SGS deadline

     ►All students must submit a Course ADD/DROP form to the graduate office (signed by student & supervisor) as follows: 

Reading Course (2 forms to submit): (MEng students cannot add a Reading Course without a MEng Project)

MEng Project: MEng Project list here (2 forms to submit):

COURSE OFFERINGS LEGEND Courses are designated to be taught Annually, Biennially (every other year), or Occasionally. However, instructor availability will sometimes affect when a course is next offered.

Courses designated Research are mainly intended for research stream graduate students, to prepare them with a theoretical background. Therefore, these courses tend to be technical and thus are unlikely to be "introductory" or "overview" courses.

 

Academic sessions:

Course areas:

Fluid Mechanics

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
This fundamental course develops the conservation laws governing the motion of a continuum and applies the results to the case of Newtonian fluids, which leads to the Navier-Stokes equations. From these general equations, some theorems are derived from specific circumstances such as incompressible fluids or inviscid fluids. Basic solutions to, and properties of, the governing equations are explored for the case of viscous, but incompressible, fluids. Topics included involve exact solutions, low-Reynolds-number flows, and laminar boundary layers.

Undergraduate level fluid mechanics, differential and integral calculus, differential equations.
E. Young Annually
Research
Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
4
This is a first level course in turbulent flows following an exposure to basic undergraduate fluid mechanics. It deals with the governing equations of motion, statistical representation of the turbulent field and describes fundamental shear flows such as jets, wakes and boundary layers. Emphasis is placed on the physical aspects of the motion.

P. Sullivan Annually Fall 2018
Start: Sept. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
5
Finite difference and finite volume methods in fluid mechanics and heat transfer are presented. Spectral analysis is used to study the stability, accuracy and efficiency of different numerical schemes. A finite volume discretization of the conservation equations (mass, momentum, energy) is then considered. Different numerical schemes and algorithms are discussed for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. A working knowledge of a computer language is required.

Pre-requisites: MIE334 or equivalent
Need to have taken MIE 334H or equivalent.
H. Montazeri Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 14
10am-1pm
Thursday
BA 2159
6
The basic partial differential equations of material transport by fluid flow is derived along with the most significant analytical solutions of these equations, e.g., fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in pipes and channels. Prediction of heat and mass transfer rates based on analytical and numerical solutions of the governing partial differential equations. Heat transfer in fully developed pipe and channel flow, laminar boundary layers, and turbulent boundary layers. Approximate models for turbulent flows. General introduction to heat transfer in complex flows. Discussion will be centered on boundary conditions for heat transfer, similarity and dimensionless parameters, and boundary layer approximations.

J. Mostaghimi Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
7
This course is designed for students with an understanding of fluid flow and heat transfer, but with little or no background in CFD, who wish to learn how to apply CFD to solve engineering problems. The course will provide a general perspective on CFD, including different solution methods, and concepts such as accuracy, convergence, and validation and verification. Students will use the commercial software ANSYS Fluent to solve a variety of flow and heat transfer problems that illustrate a wide range of capabilities of state-of-the-art CFD software.

Pre-requisites: Undergraduate flow and heat transfer courses.
A. Sarchami Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 07
6-9pm
Thursday
RS 303
8
The purpose of this course is tor provide a basic understanding of multiphase flows. In particular, the dynamics of drops and bubbles in various flow conditions will be presented. The course will introduce the important parameters involved in analyzing multiphase flows. The equation of mass, momentum, and energy for such systems will be presented. These equations will be solved for specific conditions. Also, the methodology for solving more complex multiphase flow problems will be described.

N. Ashgriz Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
1-3pm
Tuesday
BL 113
10
In this course, we cover fundamentals of transport processes, microfabrication and integration techniquest that are relevant to micro and nanofluidic systems. Such systems have a variety of applications, including laboratories-on-a-chip for diagnostic applications, miniature chemical or power plants, or cell culture units. Discussed topics include: pressure and electrically driven fluid flow and transport in small confinements, bulk fabrication processes relevant to microfluidic systems, integration of sensors and imaging, separations, microscale cell culture systems, chemical microreactors. Scaling rules for microfluidic systems and world-to-chip interfaces between microsystems and conventional (analytical) equipment will be discussed.The course consists of a lecture combined with project work leading to a research proposal and its presentation contributed by the course participants

Pre-requisites: An undergraduate course in one (preferably two) of: Fluid Mechanics, Microfabrication or Analytical Chemistry
A. Guenther Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
12
This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive view of the fundamental concepts of wind power projects, from inception and economic viability to implementation and operation. Students will learn an appreciation for the main components of wind power systems. In addition, this course will cover the identification and quantification of the wind resource, numerical modelling and CFD techniques applied to wind power systems, wind turbine aerodynamics, design and performance, wind turbine noise, wind farm design and economic and environmental evaluation of wind projects. A final project will be undertaken involving specific technology developments in the wind industry and its potential impact on existing facilities.

J. Moran Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
3-6pm
Monday
HA 410
13
The main goal of this course is to introduce the concepts and techniques for energy management and utilization. Among the subjects to be discussed will be: energy supply and distribution, energy audits, energy efficiency in the industrial environment, mechanical and electrical applications, energy conservation, and an introduction to energy storage strategies. Practical applications include mining, manufacturing, construction (LEED, HVAC, lightning, etc.), power and process plants, oil and gas and food processing. The fundamental principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer will be used for analyzing these energy systems.

J. Moran Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
10am-1pm
Monday
HS 106
15
The course offers an introduction to turbomachinery, through the study of relevant thermodynamic concepts applied to turbomachines. The course is divided in two parts which discuss, respectively, non-compressible and compressible fluid machines. Theoretical principles are applied to a variety of turbomachines, including hydraulic pumps and turbines, centrifugal and axial compressors and fans, steam turbines, radial flow gas turbines. The emphasis is on the understanding of the thermo-fluid-dynamics involved with a systematic look at engineering approaches to turbomachine design.

Pre-requisites: Thermodynamics (MIE 210), Fluid Mechanics I (MIE 312)
S. Negro Biennially Winter 2019
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
16
Residential and industrial buildings require heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems in order to provide a comfortable living and working environment.

This course is designed to explore the fundamentals of HVAC systems. The first stop to achieve this goal is to understand the Psychrometrics which deals with the properties of moist air and how it responds to different air conditioning processes. In the next step, some of the common elements of HVAC systems are studied, followed by air quality requirements including thermal comfort, physiological considerations and environmental indices. The last step is the estimation of a building’s heat gain and loss through heat transmission in building structure as well as solar radiation, and overall heat transfer coefficient. Having access to this data, space heat loads, cooling loads, and energy cost calculations can be conducted.

M. Touchie Annually Winter 2018
schedule posted here
17
Application of conservation relations and momentum balances, dimensional analysis and scaling, mass transfer, heat transfer, and fluid flow to biological systems, including: transport in the circulation, transport in porous media and tissues, transvascular transport, transport of gases between blood and tissues, and transport in organs and organisms.

L. You Annually Fall 2017
schedule posted here
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Thermal Sciences

# Course Instructor Type Information
2
A course in which the postulatory approach is used to develop the theory of thermodynamics. The postulates are stated in terms of a variational principle that allows them to be applied to systems subjected to fields, to phase transitions, and to systems in which surface effects are dominant. The thermodynamic stability of systems is examined and examples of stable, metastable and unstable systems are discussed.

Pre-requisites: Undergraduate thermodynamics
Need to have any math course background covering calculus and partial differential equations.
C. Ward Annually
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
6-7pm
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
MC 306
3
Thermodynamics is reviewed. Quantum mechanics is introduced and used to define the possible microscopic states of macroscopic systems. For macroscopic systems in thermodynamic equilibrium, the concept of ensemble averages is introduced and the postulates of statistical mechanics are used to calculate their thermodynamic properties from knowledge of their molecular nature. Entropy is interpreted in terms of quantum mechanical concepts. The thermal properties of solids, of gases adsorbed on solid surfaces, of electrons in solids, of radiation, and of ideal gases are studied.

Pre-requisites: MIE 1101H, Advanced Classical Thermodynamics, or equivalent
C. Ward Biennially
Research
Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
5
Homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and bubble growth. Thermodynamic equilibrium and stability during phase change. Pool Boiling. Flow patterns. Models of two-phase flow. Heat transfer in flow boiling. Condensation.

S. Chandra Occasionally Winter 2017
Start: Jan. 12
Thursday
2-4pm
WB 219
6
This course will cover the fundamentals of thermal plasmas: Introduction to thermal plasma processing; plasma generation, arcs, radio frequency (rf) inductively coupled plasmas, microwave (mw) plasmas; theory of the equilibrium plasma, the Ellenbas-Heller equation for the electric arcs, theory of rf and mw plasmas, ambipolar diffusion; two- temperature plasma model; heat transport processes in thermal plasmas, heating and melting of powders in thermal plasmas, particle trajectory and heating history.

J. Mostaghimi Occasionally Winter 2017
Start: Jan. 12
Thursday
10am-12noon
MC 306
7
This course covers the basic principles of where and how global energy is currently supplied, by primary source. The aim is to provide an energy literacy that can inform research, technology development and effective policy in this area. The course content will be divided strictly according to the current global energy mix (i.e. 34% oil, 29% coal, 23% gas, 7% hydro, 5% Nuclear, 2% Other). In each case background reading and critical analyses will be applied to: (a) the characteristics of the resource; (b) the infrastructure for extraction/development of the resource; (c) the usage of the resulting energy; and (d) the implications for usage. Assignments and exams will assess both background knowledge and the ability to apply fluid flow, thermodynamic and heat transfer analyses to energy supply systems.

TBA Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
8
Analysis of the various processes occurring in internal combustion engines. Thermodynamic analysis will be conducted using gas cycles and fuel-air cycles and the results compared to actual engine cycles. The influence of air, fuel and exhaust flows, heat and mass loss, and friction is considered. The combustion process is examined, especially its influence on exhaust emissions.

Pre-requisites: MIE 516 or be taking MIE 1123 concurrently with MIE 1122. Please contract instructor to verify if you have the prerequisite.
J. Wallace Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
9
This course will deal with the basic theory of combustion in the steady state, with consideration of theories of flame propagation, flame stabilization, limits of inflammability, ignition, quenching, etc., and discussion will include both laminar and premixed flames, diffusion flames, flames and detonation.

M. Thomson Biennially Winter 2019
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
11
Reactor Physics and the Nuclear Fuel Cycle - This course covers the basic principles of the neutronic design and analysis of nuclear power reactors. Topics include radioactivity, neutron interactions with matter, the fission chain reaction, nuclear reactors, neutron diffusion and moderation, the critical reactor equation, nuclear reactor fuels, nuclear fuel cycle and economics, nuclear waste management and non-proliferation.

J. Lebenhaft Annually Fall 2017
co-taught with MIE407, schedule posted here
12
Thermal and Mechanical Design of Nuclear Power Reactors - This course covers the basic principles of the thermo-mechanical design and analysis of nuclear power reactors. Topics include reactor heat generation and removal, nuclear materials, diffusion of heat in fuel elements, thermal and mechanical stresses in fuel and reactor components, single-phase and two-phase fluid mechanics and heat transport in nuclear reactors, and core thermo-mechanical design.

H. Hasanein Annually Winter 2018
co-taught with MIE408H1S, schedule TBA
TBA
13
This course provides fundamentals and applications for thermal and hydraulic design of heat exchangers. It covers a wide range of relevant topics including the main considerations for equipment selection and design, and different methods of analysis for performance (rating) and sizing. More specialized design considerations such as flow-induced vibration are also introduced. The objective is for students to become familiar with the design and specification of industrial heat exchangers by solving practical problems using a synthesis of other mechanical engineering subjects such as thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics.

TBA Occasionally Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
14
This course introduces the theory and practical applications of lasers in science, engineering and technology. It introduces laser basics & engineering and interaction mechanisms.
The course focuses on laser applications in areas such as materials processing, laser machining, fluid mechanics, combustion, coating and surface analysis.
Advanced optical diagnostics will be discussed including laser Doppler velocimetry, laser-induced fluorescence, and other similar techniques.

M. Khosroshahi Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 15
4-7pm
Friday
MS 4171
16
Variational Calculus: introduction to calculus of variations; Euler-Lagrange equation; extensions to several variables; constrained extremals; methods of approximation. Integral Equations: their classification; series solution; boundary integral equations; delta function responses, Green´s functions, approximate techniques. Linear and Nonlinear Systems: phase space; chaos; differential algebraic systems; dynamic systems.

A. Mandelis Occasionally
Research
Winter 2017
Start: Jan. 17
Tuesday
4:30-6:30pm
MC 306 (To be Confirmed)
17
This courses covers the basic principles and design of selected alternative energy systems. Systems discussed include solar thermal systems, solar photovoltaic, wind technology, fuel cells, and energy storage.

Pre-requisites: MIE210H, MIE312H and some knowledge of chemistry, or equivalent courses
J. Wallace Annually Fall 2017
schedule posted here
18
Introduction to combustion theory. Chemical equilibrium and the products of combustion. Combustion kinetics and types of combustion. Pollutant formation. Design of combustion systems for gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. The use of alternative fuels (hydrogen, biofuels, etc.) and their effect on combustion systems.

M.Thomson Annually Fall 2017
schedule posted here
19
This course observes: conservation of mass, momentum, energy and species; diffusive momentum, heat and mass transfer; dimensionless equations and numbers; laminar boundary layers; drag, heat transfer and mass transfer coefficients; transport analogies; simultaneous heat and mass transfer; as well as evaporative cooling, droplet evaporation and diffusion flames.

Pre-requisites: MIE313H1
S. Chandra Annually Winter 2018
schedule TBA
TBA
20
This course explores exact solution techniques for common engineering Partial Differential Equations (PDEs), such as separation of variables, superposition, eigenfunctions, orthogonal functions, complex functions. Other topics include: derivation of common engineering PDEs, introduction to methods of weighted residuals for deriving finite element formulations and limitations of exact solutions relative to approximate solutions.

D. Steinman Annually Winter 2018
schedule TBA
TBA
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Mechanics and Materials

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
Topology optimisation is a relatively new computational approach to structural design that enables optimal design beyond traditional size and shape optimisation. Specifically, topology optimisation identifies where to put material and where to put holes in a structural design domain. This course will examine the theoretical background necessary for topology optimisation and the two main approaches to topology optimisation. The course will then concentrate on one of these approaches, the Simple Isotropic Material with Penalisation method, by examining a well-known code employing this method and providing an introduction to a widely used commercial code. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to program a basic topology optimisation code and interpret the results of that and other codes.

C. Steeves Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
9am-12noon
Tuesday

This course is taught in UTIAS (under the Connected Classrooms project)
MC 306
2
The primary emphasis of the course is materials properties relevant for some clean energy conversion technologies. More specifically, some materials such as inorganic solids and semi-conductors that play key roles in clean electricity production technologies such as fuel cells, gas turbines, and solar cells will be the primary focus, with their ionic and electronic conduction mechanisms and their relevance being the major part of the technical content of the course. That information will be combined with some overview-level information of a few different technologies on a broad level.

O. Kesler Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
Tuesday
6-9pm
GB 220
3
Review of tensor notation; analysis of stress in a continuum including principal stress, invariants, spherical and deviator tensors; analysis of deformation and strain in a continuum including Lagrangian and Eulerian descriptions, spherical and deviator tensors, strain rate tensors and compatibility equations; equilibrium equations; constitutive relations for general linear solid, application to elastic, plastic and viscoelastic solids; anisotropic elasticity, orthotropic materials.

T. Filleter Annually
Research
Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
4
This is a foundation course in the mechanics of cracked bodies. Both Airy´s stress function and Muskhelishvili´s complex potentials as well as the constitutive equations governing the elasto-plastic behaviour of flawed bodies will be examined. A detailed description of the analytical, numerical and experimental techniques adopted in the determination of Irwin´s stress intensity factor, Rice´s J-integral and Well´s COD will all be examined. Furthermore, the pertinent aspects of fatigue crack growth and the different fatigue design philosophies will be covered.

Pre-requisites: A strong background in the Theory of Elasticity and the Theory of Plasticity.
It is absolutely essential that students taking this course MUST have a good grasp of Solid Mechanics, Theory of Elasticity/Plasticity and Materials Science.
S. Meguid Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
12-3pm
Tuesday
MC 306
5
A cell is the basic unit of life in all organisms. Understanding cellular structures and how cells function is fundamental to all aspects of biosciences and is the basis for disease diagnostics/therapeutics and drug discovery. For single cell studies, the development of enabling micro and nanoengineered techniques/systems is a highly active field. The objectives of this course are two fold. (1) The course targets engineering graduate students to introduce essential topics in cell biology. Example topics are cells and organelles, membranes, cytoskeleton and cell motility, energy and information flow in cells, and cell signaling and communication. (2) The course will also discuss micro/nano fabricated/engineered techniques/systems for manipulating cells, stimulating cells, and quantitatively measuring cellular activities. Example topics are cell microenvironment control, microfluidics for cell biology, and stimulation and measurement techniques at the single-cell and molecular levels.

L. You, Y. Sun Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
7
Manufacturing and design issues in foamed materials processing. Solution and diffusion of gas in polymers. Sorption experiments for determining the solubility and diffusivity. Plasticizing effect of gas in a polymer. Bubble nucleation theories. Processing strategies for the production of high nucleation density foams. Mathematical model of bubble growth. Processing strategies for the bubble growth control. Effect of melt strength on bubble coalescence. Continuous processing of microcellular foamed polymers.

Pre-requisites: This course NOT meant for M.Eng. students.
C. Park Biennially Fall 2018
Start: Sept. TBA
TBA
TBA

Professor pre-approval required for M.Eng. students. Students MUST submit Course ADD Form to instructor.
TBA
8
This course provides the structure to property relationships of thermoplastic and composite foams. The crystal morphology (crystallinity, crystal size, crystal kind, crystal number, etc.), the cellular morphology (cell density, cell size, void fraction, uniformity, open cell content, etc.), and the composite structures (the fiber/platelet kind, the fiber/platelet aspect ratio, fiber/platelet orientation, the interface of fiber/platelet and matrix, etc.) affect various properties of the final products such as the thermal conductivity, the electrical conductivity, the mechanical properties, of various thermoplastic and composite foams. The mechanical properties (tensile properties, flexural properties, impact strength, etc.), the thermal conductivity (polymer conduction, gas conduction and radiation), and the electric conductivity are described as a function of the aforementioned structural parameters. The effects of the nano particles (carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene nano platelets (GNP), nanofibrils, etc.) on the properties are also discussed. Nanofibril compositess and their processing, structure characterization and property testing are also intensely discussed.

C. Park Biennially
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
9-1am
Monday & Friday
MC 306
9
Deals with the selection, analysis and design of load-bearing joints in metals, ceramics, plastics and composites. Consider welds (metal and plastic), rivets, threaded fasteners, adhesives, clamped joints, and various specialized methods of joining. These are examined with respect to stress analysis, manufacturing considerations, material selection, design applications, and cost.

Pre-requisites: Students must have taken at least one undergrad course in solid mechanics (two is recommended) and one course in machine design.
J.K. Spelt Biennially Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
12noon-3pm
Monday
BA 3008
10
The course will be centered on the Theory of Failure Analysis and how it directs engineering activity- design, research, quality systems, continuous improvement, innovation, new knowledge creation, systemic failure, and business management. This course focuses on preventive failure analysis and using the industry recognized tools to achieve this.

S. Coates Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 07
6-9pm
Thursday
LM 158
11
This course introduces the fundamentals of both product and process engineering with an emphasis on life cycle models. A mixture of practical and theoretical topics, methodologies, principles, and techniques are covered such as Life Cycle Analysis, Streamlined Life Cycle Assessment, Environmental Sustainability, and Life Cycle Engineering [e.g., Design For Assembly (DFA), Design For Manufacturing (DFM), Design For Environment (DFE), etc.]. Students will develop an understanding of the performance, cost, quality and environmental implications of both product design and manufacture. They will learn to translate these implications into engineering “cradle-to-grave” responsibility requirements, goals, and specifications, in order to maximize the value of products and the effectiveness of supply chain management, while containing the cost to the manufacturer, user, environment, and society.

P. Rahimi Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
4-7pm
Tuesday
UC 52
13
This course will present established methods that aim to enhance creativity during conceptual design. In addition, current research relevant to creativity and conceptual design will be incorporated. Students will select current research conducted at a variety of international institutions, identify limitations of reported results, determine and perform further research that can be conducted within a course, and report results.Established creativity methods will be presented during lecture. Knowledge of this material will be evaluated through written examinations.Skills in identifying, planning, conducting and reporting relevant research will be evaluated through oral presentations and written reports.

L. Shu Annually Summer 2018
May 05 - June 11, June 30-July 23
Tue. & Thur.
3-5pm

Section Code: F
RS 208
14
The course will focus on the tribology of interacting solid surfaces in the dry or lightly lubricated state. Topics will include: surface microtopography, friction, wear, erosion, dry and marginally-lubricated contacts. Attention will also be paid to surface forces and issues related to tribology of micro-systems.

J.K. Spelt Biennially Winter 2019
Start: Jan. 11
Wednesday
1-3pm
WB 219
17
Materials can exhibit dramatically altered mechanical properties and physical mechanisms when they have characteristic dimensions that are confined to small length-scales of typically below ~ 100 nm. These size-scale effects in mechanics result from the enhanced role of surfaces and interfaces, defects and material variations, and quantum effects. Nanostructured materials which exhibit these size-scale effects often have extraordinary mechanical properties as compared to their macroscopic counterparts. This course is designed to provide an introduction to nanomechanics and size-scale mechanical phenomena exhibited by nanostructured materials, and provide a platform for future advanced studies in the areas of computational/experimental nanomechanics and nanostructured materials design and application. Topics include: an introduction to nanomechanics; atomic/molecular structure of materials & nanomaterials synthesis; limitations of continuum mechanics, nanomechanical testing techniques (AFM, nanoindentation, in situ SEM/TEM); atomistic modeling techniques (DFT, MD, Course-grained MD); size-scale strength, plasticity, and fracture ; Hall-Petch strengthening, superplasticity; nanotribology, atomistic origins of friction, nanoscale wear; nano-bio-mechanics; mechanics of nanocomposites.

T. Filleter Annually
Research
Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
18
Starting with the analysis of simple discrete systems, the essential ideas of building up the governing equations of the system from those of its constituent parts is illustrated. The techniques of deriving a discrete set of equations for continuous systems are then outlined; specifically the variational and weighed residual procedures are examined and illustrated through some simple examples. The course then concentrates on applications to structural mechanics of solids. Programming for finite elements is also covered and students are encouraged to design and develop FEM software.

Pre-requisites: A strong background in PDEs, numerical analysis, and solid mechanics. Some knowledge of computer programming will be helpful.
It is essential that students taking this course MUST have a solid grasp of Solid Mechanics, Theory of Elasticity/plasticity, Matrices and Numerical Analysis.
S. Meguid Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
12-3pm
Monday
MC 306
19
This course covers the statistical analysis of data, featuring examples from various engineering fields. Topics will include: exploratory data analysis (graphical techniques, measures of location, scale, and association); basic probability (probability, random variables, and expectation); statistical inference (estimation and hypothesis testing); fundamentals of experimental design; regression analysis; the analysis of variance.

N. Montgomery Biennially Winter 2019
Start: Jan. 9th
Monday
9am-12noon
SS 2127
20
Thermodynamics and electrochemistry of fuel cell operation and testing; understanding of polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy; common fuel cell types, materials, components, and auxiliary systems; high and low temperature fuel cells and their applications in transportation and stationary power generation, including co-generation and combined heat and power systems; engineering system requirements resulting from basic fuel cell properties and characteristics.

O. Kesler Annually Winter 2018
schedule TBA
TBA
21
This course is designed to provide an integrated multidisciplinary approach to Advanced Manufacturing Engineering, and provide a strong foundation including fundamentals and applications of advanced manufacturing AM. Topics include: additive manufacturing, 3D printing, micro and nanomanufacturing, intelligent manufacturing, Advanced Materials, lean manufacturing, AM in machine design and product development, process control technologies. New applications of AM in sectors such as automotive, aerospace, biomedical, electronic, food processing.

H. Naguib Annually Winter 2018
schedule TBA
TBA
22
This course takes a 360° perspective on product design: beginning at the market need, evolving this need into a concept, and optimizing the concept. Students will gain an understanding of the steps involved and the tools utilized in developing new products. The course will integrate both business and engineering concepts seamlessly through examples, case studies and a final project. Some of the business concepts covered include: identifying customer needs, project management and the economics of product design. The engineering design tools include: developing product specifications, concept generation, concept selection, FAST diagrams, orthogonal arrays, full and fractional factorials, noises, interactions, tolerance analysis and latitude studies. Specific emphasis will be placed on robust and tunable technology for product optimization and generating product families. Critical Parameters will be developed using the Voice of the Customer (VOC), FAST diagrams and a House of Quality (HOQ).

Pre-requisites: MIE231H1 F/MIE236H1 F or equivalent
D. Nacson Annually Winter 2018
schedule TBA
TBA
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Mechatronics and Dynamics

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
Linear systems and signal sampling, Fourier transforms & frequency analysis, Laplace transforms, FFT and inverse FFT algorithms, convolution/de-convolution, impulse response, random signals, noise characterization, auto- and cross-correlation, power spectra, adaptive filters, detection and clustering.

These topics will be covered with extensive coverage on their applications to various topics in mechanical or biomedical engineering. In mechanical engineering such topics include vibrations, signal timing, spectral/phase analysis, signature analysis, thermal waves, acoustic emission, engine performance analysis, resonant acoustic spectroscopy (RAS), crack detection and location with ultrasound, flow measurements, condition-based monitoring & maintenance, fracture mechanics, etc. In biomedical engineering these topics include modeling of biomedical control systems, analysis of evoked potentials, analysis of electroencephalograms and electrocardiograms.

A.N. Sinclair & M. Eizenman Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 13
Wednesday
1-3pm
MC 306
2
Variational principles and Lagrange´s Equations, Hamilton´s principle. Kinematics of rigid body motion, Euler angles, rigid body equations of motion. Hamilton´s equations, cyclic coordinates, Legendre transformations. Canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory.

Pre-requisites: Undergraduate dynamics course or instructor approval
E. Diller Annually
Research
Winter 2018
Start: Jan. 09
TBA
TBA
TBA
3
Multi-degree of freedom systems, using both analytical and approximate methods. Vibrations of continuous systems, including strings, bars and membranes. Natural modes of plate vibration - approximate methods such as Rayleigh´s Energy Methods, Rayleigh-Ritz Method, Galerkin´s Method, and assumed mode method. Introduction to finite element analysis.

K. Behdinan Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
4
The purpose of the course is to introduce the theory and practical application of acoustics noise and vibration control. While the emphasis of the study will be on the built environment, both indoor and outdoor, the methods taught can also apply to other industries, e.g. the automotive industry. Both the physics and perception of sound will be discussed covering such wide ranging topics as concert hall design, speech intelligibility, HVAC noise control design and building isolation from rail noise, to name a few. The course combines theoretical introductions to the subjects of acoustics, noise and vibration and follows them up with case studies from industry.

TBA Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
5
Robotic control problem formulation, advance dynamic formulation for control application, dynamic model formulations, linear, nonlinear, stability definitions, local and global stability methods, integration of manipulator dynamic equations of motion, differential-algebraic systems.

Pre-requisites: At least one introductory course in control is required and a Mech Eng course in one of either Mechanisms or Vibrations.
Pre-approval of Instructor is REQUIRED in order to take this course. Copies of transcripts must be submitted upon enrollment.
J.K. Mills Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
Tuesday
10am-12noon
BA 2139
6
This course introduces some of the main concepts in nonlinear control systems design, with special emphasis on issues of practical relevance. The first part of the course is a review of basic stability analysis tools for nonlinear systems. The second part introduces a number of continuous time nonlinear controller design approaches, including controller design for systems with input and output nonlinearities, high gain controller design, passivity based controller design, and gain scheduling. The last part of the course covers the design of sampled data nonlinear controllers, which addresses the design of discrete time controllers for nonlinear continuous time systems.

Pre-requisites: MIE404 or equivalent
A. Bilton Annually
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 13
3-6pm
Wednesday
WB 219
7
This course introduces the design of intelligent robots – focusing on the principles and algorithms needed for robots to function in real world environments with people. Topics that will be covered include autonomy, social and rational intelligence, multi-modal sensing, biologically inspired and anthropomorphic robots, and human-robot interaction. Class discussions will centre on the interactive, personal, assistive and service robotics fields.

Pre-requisites: MIE404 and MIE444, or equivalent
G. Nejat Annually Summer 2018
Start: May 03 5-8pm
RS 208
8
This course provides an overview of robot mobility, control practices and multi-robot exploration and coordination. With respect to mobility, various robotic mechanisms (tracked, wheeled, snake-like) will be investigated for implementation in real world environments which can be a priori unknown and unpredictable. Control schemes that will be discussed will focus on teleoperation (with single or multiple operators), semi-autonomy and autonomy approaches, and the applicability of these different architectures for everyday applications. The course will cover both single and multi-robot systems as applied to human-centred environments. With respect to multi-robot systems, emphasis will be placed on the design of robot team architectures that address fundamental issues when completing single and/or multiple tasks.

The course will include hands-on projects which will focus on cooperation between mobile robot teams.

Pre-requisites: MIE443 and MIE404
G. Nejat Annually Winter 2017
TBA
TBA
10
The course will focus on the integration of facilities (machine tools, robotics) and the automation protocols required in the implementation of computer integrated manufacturing. Specific concepts addressed include flexible manufacturing systems (FMS); interfaces between computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing systems.

Pre-requisites: At least one manufacturing course during U/G studies. Else, subject to instructor's permission.
B. Benhabib Annually Summer 2018
May 4 - Jul 29
Wed & Fri
10 am - 1pm

Section Code: F
RS 310
11
This course provides students with tools to design, model, analyze and control precision mechatronic systems. Specifically, the class provides techniques for the modeling of various system components into a unified approach and tools for the simulation of the performance of these systems. The class also lists techniques and issues that arise when interfacing various components in order to form complex mechatronic systems. The class presents the properties and characteristics of smart material based sensors and actuators with a focus on piezoceramics, its processing and its implementation into various sensors and actuator configurations.

R. Ben Mrad Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
12
Micro and Nano robotics is an interdisciplinary field which draws on aspects of microfabrication, robotics, medicine and materials science. This project-focused course will cover the design, modeling, fabrication, and control of miniature robot and micro/nano-manipulation systems. The course includes case studies of current micro/nano-systems, challenges and future trends, and potential applications in addition to the fundamentals of physics at small size scales.

E. Diller Annually Winter 2018
schedule TBA
TBA
13
This course will present the fundamental basis of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Topics will include: micromachining/microfabrication techniques, micro sensing and actuation principles and design, MEMS modeling and simulation, and device characterization and packaging. Students will be required to complete a MEMS design term project, including design modeling, simulation, microfabrication process design, and photolithographic mask layout

Pre-requisites: MIE222H1S, MIE342H1F
Y. Sun Annually Winter 2018
schedule TBA
TBA
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Operations Research

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
Branch and bound, implicit enumeration, cutting planes, all integer tableau methods, quadratic 0-1 algorithms, commercial software, Benders´ decomposition, Lagrangian relaxation, column generation, several practical applications from the literature.

Pre-requisites: MIE262, APS1005 or equivalent
M. Bodur Annually
Research
Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
2
A course on the fundamentals of stochastic processes and their application to mathematical models in operational research. Topics discussed will include a review of probability theory, Poisson processes, renewal processes, Markov chains and other advanced processes. Emphasis on applications in inventory, queuing, reliability, repair and maintenance, etc.

Pre-requisites: MIE231 and MIE365, or permission from instructor
Need strong background in probability.
M. Cevik Annually
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
9am-12noon
Tuesday
BA B024
4
A course in renewal theory, Markov renewal theory, regenerative and semi-regenerative processes, Markov and semi-Markov processes and decision processes with emphasis on applications in production/inventory control, maintenance, communication systems, flexible manufacturing systems.

Pre-requisites: MIE1605 or equivalent.
V. Makis Biennially
Research
Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
5
This course will cover the modeling of basic and complex systems using discrete event simulation software, and related statistical methods for selecting input probability distributions, generating random variates, and making statistical inferences from simulation results. Topics will include variance-reduction techniques, experimental design and the application of optimization techniques to simulation models. Exclusion: MIE360 or equivalent. General Level Course.

TBA Biennially Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
6
This is a course on Markov Decision Processes (MDP) with an emphasis on infinite horizon MDP. The approach will include basic concepts in optimization theories in linear vector space, different types of optimality criteria, solution techniques, and approximation approaches.

Pre-requisites: Permission of Instructor
C.G. Lee Biennially
Research
Winter 2019
Start: Jan. 10
Tuesday
12noon-3pm
MC 306
7
This course reviews a wide variety of methodologies in the healthcare sector. Although many of the problems of O.R. in healthcare are analytically similar to problems in other industries, many others are quite unique due to certain characteristics of the healthcare systems. For example, the possibility of death, quality of life, difficulty of measuring quality and value of outcomes, multiple decision makers (doctors, nurses, patients, administrators), and the concept of access to healthcare as a right. We consider strategic problems of system design and planning (large allocation decisions), operational and tactical problems of management, monitoring and control methodologies; and medical management involving disease detection and treatment models.

Pre-requisites: Intro to Operations Research (deterministic and stochastic)
M.Eng. students require pre-approval from professor.
M. Carter Biennially
Research
Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
9
Rigorous introduction to the theory of linear programming. Simplex method, revised simplex method, duality, dual simplex method. Post-optimality analysis. Interior point methods. Decomposition methods. Network flow algorithms. Maximum flow, shortest path, assignment, min cost flow problems.

Pre-requisites: MIE262, APS1005 or equivalent
Require Linear Algebra and Multi-variate Calculus backround
R. Kwon Annually
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 14
3-6pm
Thursday
MC 306
10
Theory and computational methods of non-linear optimization. Convex sets, convex and concave functions. Unconstrained and Constrained Optimization. Quadratic Programming. Optimality conditions and convergence results. Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. Introduction to penalty and barrier methods. Duality in nonlinear programming.

Pre-requisites: MIE262, APS1005 or equivalent
R. Kwon Annually
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
11am-1pm
Monday
GB 119
11
The goal of this course is to familiarize students with computational quantitative techniques that are used in finance and risk management. Simulation and optimization are among the most important quantitative tools, which allow one to model and to optimize financial portfolios taking into account uncertainty in future asset values. A number of financial and risk management applications are described in detail. Matlab is used for illustrating the computations as well as for developing a software package during the course project. Practical aspects of risk modeling, which are used by industry practitioners, are emphasized.

Pre-requisites: APS1002H Financial Engineering
Students will need to use MATLAB for assignments, access to MATLAB is required. Basic knowledge of MATLAB is a pre-requisite.
TBA Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
12
This course illustrates the use of industrial engineering techniques in the field of healthcare. Common strategic, tactical, and operational decision-making problems arising in healthcare will be approached from an operations research perspective. Unique aspects of healthcare compared to other industries will be discussed. Real-world datasets will be provided to illustrate the complexity of applying standard operations research methods to healthcare.

D. Aleman Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
13
The objective of the course is to learn analytical models and overview quantitative algorithms for solving engineering and business problems. Data science or analytics is the process of deriving insights from data in order to make optimal decisions. It allows hundreds of companies and governments to save lives, increase profits and minimize resource usage. Considerable attention in the course is devoted to applications of computational and modeling algorithms to finance, risk management, marketing, health care, smart city projects, crime prevention, predictive maintenance, web and social media analytics, personal analytics, etc. Materials in this course are quantitative and computational in nature as well as analytical. Topics include basic statistic, regressions, uncertainty modeling, simulation and optimization modeling, data mining and machine learning, text analytics, artificial intelligence, big data fundamentals and visualizations. IPython and IBM Watson Analytics are modeling and visualization software used in this course. Practical aspects of computational models and case studies in Interactive Python are emphasized.

O. Romanko Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 18
6-9pm
Monday
MC 254
14
Branch and bound, implicit enumeration, cutting planes, all integer tableau methods, quadratic 0-1 algorithms, commercial software, Benders´ decomposition, Lagrangian relaxation, column generation, several practical applications from the literature.

Pre-requisites: MIE262, APS1005 or equivalent
M. Bodur Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
16
The goal of the course is to introduce students to principles of reliability from a practical point of view. The course covers principles of quality, principles of reliability, reliability of systems, failure rate data and models, quality and reliability in design and manufacturing, and reliability and availability in maintenance including cost models. Some other topics could be covered, depending on timing. A moderate knowledge of probability and statistics is a requirement.

Pre-requisites: Any second year engineering or higher level course in probability and statistics
TBA Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
17
Determination of optimal maintenance and replacement practices for components and capital equipment; resources of manpower and machinery required for implementation of maintenance practices; and the use of mathematical models in the development of a maintenance information system. The lectures will be supplemented by case study assignments: E.g., Short-term deterministic replacement; Short-term probabilistic replacement; OREST, PERDEC, AGE/CON, SMS and EXAKT programs.

A.K.S. Jardine Biennially Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 06
5-8pm
Wednesday
MC 252
19
MIE561 is a “cap-stone” course. Its purpose is to give students an opportunity to integrate the Industrial Engineering tools learned in previous courses by applying them to real world problems. While the specific focus of the case studies used to illustrate the application of Industrial Engineering will be the Canadian health care system, the approach to problem solving adopted in this course will be applicable to any setting. This course will provide a framework for identifying and resolving problems in a complex, unstructured decision-making environment. It will give students the opportunity to apply a problem identification framework through real world case studies. The case studies will involve people from the health care industry bringing current practical problems to the class. Students work in small groups preparing a feasibility study discussing potential approaches. Although the course is directed at Industrial Engineering fourth year and graduate students, it does not assume specific previous knowledge, and the course is open to students in other disciplines.

M.W. Carter Annually Winter 2018
schedule posted here
20
This course takes a practical approach to scheduling problems and solution techniques, motivating the different mathematical definitions of scheduling with real world scheduling systems and problems. Topics covered include: job shop scheduling, timetabling, project scheduling, and the variety of solution approaches including constraint programming, local search, heuristics, and dispatch rules. Also covered will be information engineering aspects of building scheduling systems for real world problems.

Pre-requisites: Please refer to the undergraduate page: here
V. Quan Annually Fall 2017
schedule posted here
21
The purpose of this course is to provide a working knowledge of methods of analysis of problems and of decision making in the face of uncertainty. Topics include decision trees, subjective probability assessment, multi-attribute utility approaches, goal programming, Analytic Hierarchy Process and the psychology of decision making.

Pre-requisites: Please refer to the undergraduate page: here
D. Frances Annually Fall 2017
schedule posted here
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Human Factors & Ergonomics

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
Introduction to principles, methods, and tools for the analysis, design and evaluation of human-centred systems. Consideration of impacts of human perceptual and cognitive factors on the design and use of engineered systems. Basic concepts of workload, human error and reliability, and human factors standards. The human-centred systems design process, including task analysis, user requirements generation, prototyping and usability evaluation. Design of procedures, displays and controls and training systems; design for error prevention and human-computer interaction; design for aging populations.

G. Jamieson Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 13
3-5pm
Wednesday
RS 310
2
The course deals with practical problems associated with the design of experiments in Human Factors research, with an emphasis on the use of statistical packages and data analysis tools. Topics covered will include analysis of variance, non- parametric statistics, balanced and unbalanced block designs (including Latin squares), confidence intervals, etc. Stress is given to practical problems and the intuitive understanding of applied statistics.

M. Chignell Annually
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 07
4-7pm
Thursday
GB 221
3
This course is intended for people carrying out graduate level research in Human Factors. It covers a variety of techniques for recording and analyzing empirical data. Topics to be covered include psychophysical methods, subjective scaling, questionnaires, signal detection theory, information theory, physiological monitoring, spectral analysis, tracking, and manual control modeling. There is no textbook for the course. Evaluation is based on a series of assignments related to the topics covered in class.

P. Milgram Annually
Research
Fall 2018
Start: Sept. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
5
Introduction to ergonomics in industrial settings. Biomechanics related to manual materials handling, repetitive strain injuries, visual and auditory limitations, human information processing and short term memory limitations, psychomotor skill, anthropometry and workspace layout, population stereotypes, design of controls and displays, circadian rhythms and design of shift work schedules. Exclusions: MIE240H or MIE343H.

Pre-requisites: May not have taken an introduction to physical ergonomics or kinesiology previously.
If student has previously taken an ergonomics course, please contact the professor before enrolling.
TBA Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
6
A survey of theoretical and applied issues in human interaction with automation. Topics included are: philosophy of human-machine systems, types and levels of automation, models of human-automation interaction, function allocation, mode error, bias, trust, workload and situation awareness, automation interfaces, decision-aiding, adaptable and adaptive (intelligent) automation, supervisory control, and management of human-automation systems

Pre-requisites: MIE1403 or MIE1407 or consent of the instructor
G. Jamieson Biennially
Research
Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
7
This course covers various statistical models used in empirical research, in particular human factors research, including linear regression, mixed linear models, non-parametric models, generalized linear models, time series modeling, and cluster analysis. For various observational and experimental data, students will be proficient in generating relevant hypotheses to answer research questions, selecting and building appropriate statistical models, and effectively communicating these results through interpretation and presentation of results. Basic knowledge in probability, statistics, and experimental design is required. The course will not focus on the design of experiments. In addition to homework assignments and exams, the students will review and critique journal articles and conference papers for the validity of the use of various statistical models. The students will work on a term long project of their choice and will be encouraged to relate this assignment to their current research projects. The examples used in class and the assignments will be drawn from human factors research. However, the students will not be required to use human factors data for their project.

B. Donmez Annually
Research
Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
8
The course will cover a wide range of human factors topics related to transportation, in particular motor vehicle transportation. The students will gain an understanding of road user characteristics and limitations and how these affect design of traffic control devices and the roadway. The course topics include: history and scope of human factors in transportation; vision and information processing in the context of driving; driver adaptation; driver education, driver licensing and regulation; traffic control devices; crash types, causes, and countermeasures; alcohol, drug, and fatigue effects; forensic human factors.

The course will be taught in the form of lectures followed by relevant case studies involving practical application of knowledge gained. Case studies, and related assigned readings, will involve human factors in relation to crash pattern analysis and countermeasure selection, highway and traffic control design issues, driver regulation policy issues, and forensic investigation. The students will work on two projects, one in each half of the term, on topics of their choice. They will be asked to make presentations on these projects.

TBA Annually
Research
Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
9
Frameworks, tools and methods for the analysis and design of cognitive work. The course will emphasize computer-based work in production- and/or safety-critical systems. Primary frameworks include Cognitive Work Analysis and Ecological Interface Design, with consideration of complementary perspectives in Cognitive Systems Engineering. The design element will emphasize the human-machine interface.

Pre-requisites: psychology, covering at least visual perception, memory & principles of spatial navigation: MIE448/1407/523
A. Hilliard / S. Kortschot Biennially
Research
Fall 2018
Start: Sept. TBA
TBA
TBA

All interested students should come to the first class on September (Day: Sept. XX) to discuss course outline and expected term work; even if the course is full
TBA
10
An examination of the relation between behavioural science and the design of human-machine systems, with special attention to advanced control room design. Human limitations on perception, attention, memory and decision making, and the design of displays and intelligent machines to supplement them. The human operator in process control and the supervisory control of automated and robotic systems. Laboratory exercises to introduce techniques of evaluating human performance.

Pre-requisites: Please refer to the undergraduate page: here
S. Soung Yee Annually Fall 2017
schedule posted here
11
The integration of human factors into engineering projects. Human factors integration (HFI) process and systems constraints, HFI tools, and HFI best practices. Modelling, economics, and communication of HFI problems. Examples of HFI drawn from energy, healthcare, military, and software systems. Application of HFI theory and methods to a capstone design project, including HFI problem specification, concept generation, and selection through an iterative and open-ended design process.

K. Iwsa-Madge & R. Leger Annually Winter 2018
schedule posted here
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Information Engineering

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
Information Engineering focuses on the representation and use of information in the context of the web. The first part of the course covers the Semantic Web, including XML, RDF, Linked Data, Provenance, Trust and Data Mashup. The second part covers web-based Knowledge Representations, including: Description Logic, OWL, SWRL, and Ontologies.

M. Fox Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
3-6pm
Monday
UC 330
2
To remain competitive, enterprises must become increasingly agile and integrated across their functions. Enterprise models play a critical role in this integration, enabling improved designs for enterprises, analysis of their performance, and management of their operations. This course motivates the need for enterprise models and introduces the concepts of generic and deductive enterprise models. It reviews research to date on enterprise modelling, including emerging standards and implementation technologies.

Pre-requisites: MIE1501
M. Gruninger Biennially Fall 2018
*NOTE: Course Schedule Change*
Start: Sept. 13
6-8pm
Tuesday
UC 65
3
This course will explore theoretical techniques for the design and analysis of formal ontologies. Topics will include the design of verified ontologies, methodologies for proving properties about ontologies, and applications of classification theorems from mathematics. These techniques will be applied to ontologies that are currently being used in government and industry.

Pre-requisites: MIE457 and MIE1501
M. Gruninger Biennially
Research
Winter 2018
Start: Sept. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
4
This course is a research seminar that focuses on recent developments in the area of Data Analytics. Science, businesses, society and government are been revolutionized by data-driven methods. The increased access to large quantities of digital information has provided new opportunities for innovation. A new area of Data Analytics, known as Big Data, is made possible thanks to novel affordable techniques for processing huge amounts of data. This seminar provides an overview of data analytics concepts, approaches, and techniques, including distributed computations on massive datasets and frameworks for enabling large-scale parallel data processing on clusters of commodity servers. Emphasis is given to algorithmic techniques for analyzing Web Data. The course evaluation is based on course presentations and a project. The project goal is to prepare publishable research contributions in the area of data analytics.

Pre-requisites: An undergraduate level course in Databases, such as MIE253 Data Modelling, or equivalent.
M. Consens Annually Winter 2018
Start: Jan. TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
5
This course provides students with an understanding of the role of a decision support system in an organization, its components, and the theories and techniques used to construct them. The course will focus on information analysis to support organizational decision-making needs and will cover topics including information retrieval, descriptive and predictive modeling using machine learning and data mining, recommendation systems, and effective visualization and communication of analytical results.

S. Sanner Annually Fall 2017
co-taught with MIE451, schedule posted here
GB 248
6
The course objective is to familiarize students with the principles and methods of systems engineering. Topics include system level thinking in the product development process, the morphology of system level design, the conceptual design loop, system level multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO), system architecture studies, future trends, system level technology readiness levels, system risk assessment, product launch decision making, and system level validation and risk reduction techniques, using examples and applications from industries such as aerospace. The course will prepare students who are or will be involved in high technology complex systems, and the preliminary and detailed design of products. The course will be delivered using a mixture of formal presentations, informal discussions, and applications of key aspects of systems engineering. Quizzes, assignments, and workshops will allow students to put theory into practice.

N. Youssef Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 20
5-8pm
Wednesday
GB 248
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Reading Courses

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
Students may take only one reading course for credit in a degree program, unless special authorization has been granted by the Graduate Studies Committee.

Supervisor
2
Students may take only one reading course for credit in a degree program, unless special authorization has been granted by the Graduate Studies Committee.

Supervisor
3
Students may take only one reading course for credit in a degree program, unless special authorization has been granted by the Graduate Studies Committee.

Supervisor
4
Students may take only one reading course for credit in a degree program, unless special authorization has been granted by the Graduate Studies Committee.

Supervisor
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