Graduate

Course Schedule and Descriptions

* Summer Course Registration on ROSI begins:  APRIL 7th*

Winter 2014 1000-level graduate courses begin the week of January 6th unless otherwise indicated. 500-level courses, and 1000-level courses associated with a 400-level course, also begins on January 6th.

2013/14 course ADD and DROP dates are listed here.

Courses are designated (Freq) to be taught A: annually, B: biennially (every other year), or C: occasionally. However, instructor availability will sometimes affect when a course is next offered.

The complete list of ELITE (APS) graduate courses is here. The schedule for ELITE courses offered by the Department of MIE is here.

View semester: All upcoming semesters   Winter 2014   Summer 2014   Fall 2014   

APS Engineering Courses

Course Instructor Freq. Next Offered
APS1002H: Financial Engineering

This course will focus on capital budgeting, financial optimization, and project evaluation models and their solution techniques. In particular, linear, non-linear, and integer programming models and their solutions techniques will be studied. The course will give engineering students a background in modern capital budgeting and financial techniques that are relevant in practical engineering and commercial settings

Pre-requisites: Linear Algebra, Probability and Statistics, Calculus at the undergraduate level

R. Kwon A Fall 2013, Start: Sept. 12
Thursday
5-8pm, BA 1200
APS1002H: Financial Engineering

This course will focus on capital budgeting, financial optimization, and project evaluation models and their solution techniques. In particular, linear, non-linear, and integer programming models and their solutions techniques will be studied. The course will give engineering students a background in modern capital budgeting and financial techniques that are relevant in practical engineering and commercial settings

Pre-requisites: Linear Algebra, Probability and Statistics, Calculus at the undergraduate level

R. Kwon A Winter 2014, Start: Jan. 16
5-8pm
Thursday, MS 3171
APS1003H: Professional Education and Instruction

This course is designed for people with an interest in continuing education and teaching in the engineering workplace. The course content is applicable to the development of courses, training programs, or the development of documentation such as instructions. Basic concepts in adult learning and current research in professional education will be introduced and discussed. Students will be required to develop training and teaching materials. By the end of the course, students should have an understanding of the important ideas that currently inform the practice of professional education and have experience applying these ideas to the development of instructional documents. Exclusion: MIE 3002H.

S. McCahan A Summer 2014, May 5 - May 16 (2-week intensive course)

Section Code: F

schedule posted here, GB 304
APS1005H: Operations Research for Engineering Management

This course introduces optimization techniques applicable in solving various engineering programs. These techniques are widely used in engineering design, optimal control, production planning, reliability engineering, and operations management. The contents of this course can be classified into two major categories: modeling techniques and Optimization algorithms. Topics include linear programming, sensitivity analysis, nonlinear programming, dynamic programming, decision making under uncertainty, new developments in optimization techniques. The course will also examine several case studies to gain understanding of real applications of optimization techniques.

Pre-requisites: none. Exclusions: Previous course in Operations Research (OR) equivalent to MIE262.

D. Frances A Summer 2014, Aug. 6 - Aug. 19
9am-12noon (LEC)
4-5pm (TUT)

Section Code: S

schedule posted here, BA 1200
APS1012H: Management of Innovation in Engineering

This course will provide students with the core concepts of innovation including: strategic thinking, transformational change management, innovative enterprise design & development, and sustaining a culture of innovation. This seminar style course will equip students with the knowledge and the skills to manage innovation at strategic and operational levels. The management of innovation is interdisciplinary and multi-functional, requiring the international alignment of market forces, technological systems and organizational change to improve the competitiveness and effectiveness of organizations and society. We shall argue that the process of innovation management is essentially generic, although organization, technological and market specific factors will constrain choices and actions. This course will incorporate both academic readings to provide the broad theory of innovation, but most of the readings and discussion will be based on the instructor´s many years of hands on practical experience in innovation in a variety of industry sectors.

S. Armstrong A Winter 2014, ONLINE
APS1012H: Management of Innovation in Engineering

This course will provide students with the core concepts of innovation including: strategic thinking, transformational change management, innovative enterprise design & development, and sustaining a culture of innovation. This seminar style course will equip students with the knowledge and the skills to manage innovation at strategic and operational levels. The management of innovation is interdisciplinary and multi-functional, requiring the international alignment of market forces, technological systems and organizational change to improve the competitiveness and effectiveness of organizations and society. We shall argue that the process of innovation management is essentially generic, although organization, technological and market specific factors will constrain choices and actions. This course will incorporate both academic readings to provide the broad theory of innovation, but most of the readings and discussion will be based on the instructor´s many years of hands on practical experience in innovation in a variety of industry sectors.

S. Armstrong A Summer 2014, Aug. 11-Aug. 22 (2-week intensive course)

Section Code: S

schedule posted here, SF 2202
APS1013H: Applying Innovation in Engineering

This course will teach students the application of the tools and techniques of innovation management including: strategic and systems thinking, business process management, creativity and problem solving, solution design & implementation, effective organizational teamwork and project management. This seminar style course aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills to apply the tools of creativity and innovation to solve a real world technological business problem. Applying innovation will enable students in a team approach to actually use the tools in the class and on an industrial project either at their employer (preferably) or an external enterprise. This course will also incorporate both academic scholarly papers that will build on the readings in the Management of Innovation APS1012 course. In addition the instructor will provide coaching based on many years of hands on practical experience solving technological problems in a variety of industry sectors. Though not mandatory it would be ideal if students have completed the course APS1012 - Management of Innovation in Engineering - that provides students with a conceptual understanding of the broad field of strategic innovation.

S. Armstrong A  
APS1014H: Advanced Project Management

Project management itself is not itself an “advanced” discipline. It can be seen as simply a “tool box” of processes and tools which is easy to talk about and to “learn” in theory. What makes our management of projects more “advanced” is our effective application of those processes and tools to actual projects. This course attempts to do so as much as can be done in a classroom. There will be a case study to read and prepare for each week. There will be experienced guest speakers to take up those case studies and to discuss project management in their application areas.

Pre-requisites: APS 1001H, and 1 year work experience

No Lecture on February 15, 2014

K. Farndale A Winter 2014, Start: Jan. 11
9am-12noon
Saturday, WB 219
APS1015H: Social Entrepreneurship

This course is designed for engineering students interested in starting a business venture that advances social and/or environmental good. The course provides students with as real a “social entrepreneurship” experience as is possible within a course setting – students will, independently or in groups, construct a Business Model for their entrepreneurial idea, and will pitch their model to a panel of Angel investors. Most lectures will run workshop-style: industry experts (in social marketing, social finance, HR, law and other fields), along with real social entrepreneurs, will work one-on-one with students to help refine their business models in preparation for the investment pitch. Other lectures, along with course readings, will focus on understanding the field of social entrepreneurship, with a particular emphasis on topics relevant to engineering such as clean tech commercialization and the growing field of “impact investing”.

N. Tasevski A Summer 2014, May 20-May 30
9am-12noon

Section Code: Y

schedule posted here, TBA
APS1016H: Financial Management for Engineers

The students will be exposed to classical equity valuation methods, such as discounted cash flow analysis, net asset value, fundamental analysis and relative value analysis, using measures such as P/E multiples and P/Cash flow multiples. The students will be introduced to the principles of Bond and Stock valuations with a special emphasis on its relation to the cost of capital. The course will take an in depth view of capital budgeting, capital investment decisions and project analysis and evaluations. It will introduce students to the concept risk and return in equity markets. The students will get hands on experience in calculating cost of capital and hence the appropriate discount rate to use in valuations. Theory of optimal capital structure and financial leverage will be discussed in addition to economic value added principles. The relevance of dividends and dividend policy will be debated in class. The concept of “does dividend policy matter" will be subject of a vigorous debate. Finally the topic of mergers and acquisitions will be covered in depth, with particular reference to recent mergers of Canadian companies.

B. Gajaria A Summer 2014, May 6 - Jul 29
Tue.
4-6pm

Section Code: F

schedule posted here, BA 1200
APS1017H: Supply Chain Management and Logistics

This course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the defining supply chain systems while developing an understanding of the complexity, opportunities, and pit-falls of management issues regarding these systems. Topics will include inventory theories, transportation, postponement strategies, supply chain dynamics, value of information, supply chain flexibility, and risk management. We will focus on the analytical decision support tools (both models and applications) as well as on the organizational models that successfully allow companies to develop, implement and sustain supplier management and collaborative strategies.

Pre-requisites: one or two undergrad courses on probability and statistics

C.G. Lee A Summer 2014, June 23-July 04
12noon-3pm

Section Code: S

schedule posted here, BA 2195
APS1022H: Financial Engineering II

The course presents two important topics in financial engineering: portfolio optimization and derivative pricing.
These two topics are explored by the application of a number of mathematical tools, including linear programming, nonlinear programming, statistical analysis, and the theory of stochastic calculus.

Pre-requisites: must have successfully completed APS1002H (Financial Engineering)

R. Kwon, C.G. Lee A Summer 2014, May 12-May 23
1-4pm

Section Code: F

schedule posted here, BA 2185
APS1023H: New Product Innovation

This course examines technical and organizational aspects of managing new products and process innovations. Topics include human creativity and problem solving, product design and development, product feasibility assessments, requirements engineering, managing research and development, project management, team communication, technology implementation, and innovation strategy.

A. Rahim A Summer 2014, May 15 - Jul 17 (12-week course)
Thur.
6-8pm

Section Code: Y

schedule posted here, BA 1240
APS1202H: Engineering and Sustainable Development

This course will examine the integration of sustainable development issues (including climate change) into current engineering practice, and show how the incorporation of the associated ideas is bringing resource, ecological, and social issues into the mainstream of engineering design. Course discussions and presentations will include methods for evaluating the sustainability of projects; the selection of appropriate project goals considering issues of regulation, measurement, and stakeholder involvement; global perspectives and the effects of differing international priorities; and conflicts between responsibility and innovation, ethics and practice. Students will develop a thorough understanding of sustainability in engineering as it is currently practiced, and the challenges and opportunities that societal issues present to the profession. The course will be delivered as a mix of presentations, workshops and discussions.



J. Boyd A Winter 2014, Start: Jan. 8
7-9pm
Wednesday, BA 2135
JMG2020H: Big Data and Global Cities

As urban populations grow, global cities need to provide basic services (e.g. water, sanitation, public safety, transit) and address the negative externalities associated with rapid growth (e.g. pollution and congestion). And, ultimately, they need to find the fiscal resources to pay for the services. This course will set out a basic political economy framework to understand the problems faced by global cities and show how Big Data can be used to help solve those problems. The course will provide an introduction to the concepts that underlie Big Data – open, unified, linked and grounded data – as well as data analytics (statistics, pattern recognition, and machine learning). Students will work with data to address specific urban problems in global cities.

M. Fox and E. Slack A Fall 2014, schedule posted here