Graduate Courses

FALL COURSE ENROLMENT BEGINS AUGUST 2nd, 2017

The complete list of ALL ELITE (APS) graduate courses is here

Students who wish to enrol in 500-level courses are encouraged to do so as early as possible as seats are limited.

Fall 2017 1000-level graduate courses begin the week of September 11 unless otherwise indicated. 500-level courses, and 1000-level courses associated with a 400-level course, begins the week of September 4.

COURSE ADD/DROP DEADLINES:  2017 MIE course ADD and DROP dates are listed here.  For APS Summer courses, please follow deadline dates per ELITE's schedule as noted on the 'Admin. Info' section of each course.

For All Reading Course (MIE 2002H, 2003H, 2004, 2005H) and M.Eng. Project (MIE 8888Y):

     ► ADD and DROP dates are 3 days before the posted SGS deadline

     ►All students must submit a Course ADD/DROP form to the graduate office (signed by student & supervisor) as follows: 

Reading Course (2 forms to submit): (MEng students cannot add a Reading Course without a MEng Project)

MEng Project: MEng Project list here (2 forms to submit):

COURSE OFFERINGS LEGEND Courses are designated to be taught Annually, Biennially (every other year), or Occasionally. However, instructor availability will sometimes affect when a course is next offered.

Courses designated Research are mainly intended for research stream graduate students, to prepare them with a theoretical background. Therefore, these courses tend to be technical and thus are unlikely to be "introductory" or "overview" courses.

 

Academic sessions:

Course areas:

Fluid Mechanics

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
Finite difference and finite volume methods in fluid mechanics and heat transfer are presented. Spectral analysis is used to study the stability, accuracy and efficiency of different numerical schemes. A finite volume discretization of the conservation equations (mass, momentum, energy) is then considered. Different numerical schemes and algorithms are discussed for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. A working knowledge of a computer language is required.

Pre-requisites: MIE334 or equivalent
Need to have taken MIE 334H or equivalent.
H. Montazeri Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 14
10am-1pm
Thursday
BA 2159
2
This course is designed for students with an understanding of fluid flow and heat transfer, but with little or no background in CFD, who wish to learn how to apply CFD to solve engineering problems. The course will provide a general perspective on CFD, including different solution methods, and concepts such as accuracy, convergence, and validation and verification. Students will use the commercial software ANSYS Fluent to solve a variety of flow and heat transfer problems that illustrate a wide range of capabilities of state-of-the-art CFD software.

Pre-requisites: Undergraduate flow and heat transfer courses.
A. Sarchami Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 07
6-9pm
Thursday
RS 303
3
The purpose of this course is tor provide a basic understanding of multiphase flows. In particular, the dynamics of drops and bubbles in various flow conditions will be presented. The course will introduce the important parameters involved in analyzing multiphase flows. The equation of mass, momentum, and energy for such systems will be presented. These equations will be solved for specific conditions. Also, the methodology for solving more complex multiphase flow problems will be described.

N. Ashgriz Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
1-3pm
Tuesday
BL 113
4
This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive view of the fundamental concepts of wind power projects, from inception and economic viability to implementation and operation. Students will learn an appreciation for the main components of wind power systems. In addition, this course will cover the identification and quantification of the wind resource, numerical modelling and CFD techniques applied to wind power systems, wind turbine aerodynamics, design and performance, wind turbine noise, wind farm design and economic and environmental evaluation of wind projects. A final project will be undertaken involving specific technology developments in the wind industry and its potential impact on existing facilities.

J. Moran Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
3-6pm
Monday
HA 410
5
The main goal of this course is to introduce the concepts and techniques for energy management and utilization. Among the subjects to be discussed will be: energy supply and distribution, energy audits, energy efficiency in the industrial environment, mechanical and electrical applications, energy conservation, and an introduction to energy storage strategies. Practical applications include mining, manufacturing, construction (LEED, HVAC, lightning, etc.), power and process plants, oil and gas and food processing. The fundamental principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer will be used for analyzing these energy systems.

J. Moran Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
10am-1pm
Monday
HS 106
6
Application of conservation relations and momentum balances, dimensional analysis and scaling, mass transfer, heat transfer, and fluid flow to biological systems, including: transport in the circulation, transport in porous media and tissues, transvascular transport, transport of gases between blood and tissues, and transport in organs and organisms.

L. You Annually Fall 2017
schedule posted here
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Thermal Sciences

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
A course in which the postulatory approach is used to develop the theory of thermodynamics. The postulates are stated in terms of a variational principle that allows them to be applied to systems subjected to fields, to phase transitions, and to systems in which surface effects are dominant. The thermodynamic stability of systems is examined and examples of stable, metastable and unstable systems are discussed.

Pre-requisites: Undergraduate thermodynamics
Need to have any math course background covering calculus and partial differential equations.
C. Ward Annually
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
6-7pm
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
MC 306
2
Reactor Physics and the Nuclear Fuel Cycle - This course covers the basic principles of the neutronic design and analysis of nuclear power reactors. Topics include radioactivity, neutron interactions with matter, the fission chain reaction, nuclear reactors, neutron diffusion and moderation, the critical reactor equation, nuclear reactor fuels, nuclear fuel cycle and economics, nuclear waste management and non-proliferation.

J. Lebenhaft Annually Fall 2017
co-taught with MIE407, schedule posted here
3
This course introduces the theory and practical applications of lasers in science, engineering and technology. It introduces laser basics & engineering and interaction mechanisms.
The course focuses on laser applications in areas such as materials processing, laser machining, fluid mechanics, combustion, coating and surface analysis.
Advanced optical diagnostics will be discussed including laser Doppler velocimetry, laser-induced fluorescence, and other similar techniques.

M. Khosroshahi Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 15
4-7pm
Friday
MS 4171
4
This courses covers the basic principles and design of selected alternative energy systems. Systems discussed include solar thermal systems, solar photovoltaic, wind technology, fuel cells, and energy storage.

Pre-requisites: MIE210H, MIE312H and some knowledge of chemistry, or equivalent courses
J. Wallace Annually Fall 2017
schedule posted here
5
Introduction to combustion theory. Chemical equilibrium and the products of combustion. Combustion kinetics and types of combustion. Pollutant formation. Design of combustion systems for gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. The use of alternative fuels (hydrogen, biofuels, etc.) and their effect on combustion systems.

M.Thomson Annually Fall 2017
schedule posted here
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Mechanics and Materials

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
Topology optimisation is a relatively new computational approach to structural design that enables optimal design beyond traditional size and shape optimisation. Specifically, topology optimisation identifies where to put material and where to put holes in a structural design domain. This course will examine the theoretical background necessary for topology optimisation and the two main approaches to topology optimisation. The course will then concentrate on one of these approaches, the Simple Isotropic Material with Penalisation method, by examining a well-known code employing this method and providing an introduction to a widely used commercial code. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to program a basic topology optimisation code and interpret the results of that and other codes.

C. Steeves Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
9am-12noon
Tuesday

This course is taught in UTIAS (under the Connected Classrooms project)
MC 306
2
The primary emphasis of the course is materials properties relevant for some clean energy conversion technologies. More specifically, some materials such as inorganic solids and semi-conductors that play key roles in clean electricity production technologies such as fuel cells, gas turbines, and solar cells will be the primary focus, with their ionic and electronic conduction mechanisms and their relevance being the major part of the technical content of the course. That information will be combined with some overview-level information of a few different technologies on a broad level.

O. Kesler Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
Tuesday
6-9pm
GB 220
3
This is a foundation course in the mechanics of cracked bodies. Both Airy´s stress function and Muskhelishvili´s complex potentials as well as the constitutive equations governing the elasto-plastic behaviour of flawed bodies will be examined. A detailed description of the analytical, numerical and experimental techniques adopted in the determination of Irwin´s stress intensity factor, Rice´s J-integral and Well´s COD will all be examined. Furthermore, the pertinent aspects of fatigue crack growth and the different fatigue design philosophies will be covered.

Pre-requisites: A strong background in the Theory of Elasticity and the Theory of Plasticity.
It is absolutely essential that students taking this course MUST have a good grasp of Solid Mechanics, Theory of Elasticity/Plasticity and Materials Science.
S. Meguid Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
12-3pm
Tuesday
MC 306
4
This course provides the structure to property relationships of thermoplastic and composite foams. The crystal morphology (crystallinity, crystal size, crystal kind, crystal number, etc.), the cellular morphology (cell density, cell size, void fraction, uniformity, open cell content, etc.), and the composite structures (the fiber/platelet kind, the fiber/platelet aspect ratio, fiber/platelet orientation, the interface of fiber/platelet and matrix, etc.) affect various properties of the final products such as the thermal conductivity, the electrical conductivity, the mechanical properties, of various thermoplastic and composite foams. The mechanical properties (tensile properties, flexural properties, impact strength, etc.), the thermal conductivity (polymer conduction, gas conduction and radiation), and the electric conductivity are described as a function of the aforementioned structural parameters. The effects of the nano particles (carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene nano platelets (GNP), nanofibrils, etc.) on the properties are also discussed. Nanofibril compositess and their processing, structure characterization and property testing are also intensely discussed.

C. Park Biennially
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
9-1am
Monday & Friday
MC 306
5
Deals with the selection, analysis and design of load-bearing joints in metals, ceramics, plastics and composites. Consider welds (metal and plastic), rivets, threaded fasteners, adhesives, clamped joints, and various specialized methods of joining. These are examined with respect to stress analysis, manufacturing considerations, material selection, design applications, and cost.

Pre-requisites: Students must have taken at least one undergrad course in solid mechanics (two is recommended) and one course in machine design.
J.K. Spelt Biennially Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
12noon-3pm
Monday
BA 3008
6
The course will be centered on the Theory of Failure Analysis and how it directs engineering activity- design, research, quality systems, continuous improvement, innovation, new knowledge creation, systemic failure, and business management. This course focuses on preventive failure analysis and using the industry recognized tools to achieve this.

S. Coates Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 07
6-9pm
Thursday
LM 158
7
This course introduces the fundamentals of both product and process engineering with an emphasis on life cycle models. A mixture of practical and theoretical topics, methodologies, principles, and techniques are covered such as Life Cycle Analysis, Streamlined Life Cycle Assessment, Environmental Sustainability, and Life Cycle Engineering [e.g., Design For Assembly (DFA), Design For Manufacturing (DFM), Design For Environment (DFE), etc.]. Students will develop an understanding of the performance, cost, quality and environmental implications of both product design and manufacture. They will learn to translate these implications into engineering “cradle-to-grave” responsibility requirements, goals, and specifications, in order to maximize the value of products and the effectiveness of supply chain management, while containing the cost to the manufacturer, user, environment, and society.

P. Rahimi Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
4-7pm
Tuesday
UC 52
8
Starting with the analysis of simple discrete systems, the essential ideas of building up the governing equations of the system from those of its constituent parts is illustrated. The techniques of deriving a discrete set of equations for continuous systems are then outlined; specifically the variational and weighed residual procedures are examined and illustrated through some simple examples. The course then concentrates on applications to structural mechanics of solids. Programming for finite elements is also covered and students are encouraged to design and develop FEM software.

Pre-requisites: A strong background in PDEs, numerical analysis, and solid mechanics. Some knowledge of computer programming will be helpful.
It is essential that students taking this course MUST have a solid grasp of Solid Mechanics, Theory of Elasticity/plasticity, Matrices and Numerical Analysis.
S. Meguid Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
12-3pm
Monday
MC 306
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Mechatronics and Dynamics

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
Linear systems and signal sampling, Fourier transforms & frequency analysis, Laplace transforms, FFT and inverse FFT algorithms, convolution/de-convolution, impulse response, random signals, noise characterization, auto- and cross-correlation, power spectra, adaptive filters, detection and clustering.

These topics will be covered with extensive coverage on their applications to various topics in mechanical or biomedical engineering. In mechanical engineering such topics include vibrations, signal timing, spectral/phase analysis, signature analysis, thermal waves, acoustic emission, engine performance analysis, resonant acoustic spectroscopy (RAS), crack detection and location with ultrasound, flow measurements, condition-based monitoring & maintenance, fracture mechanics, etc. In biomedical engineering these topics include modeling of biomedical control systems, analysis of evoked potentials, analysis of electroencephalograms and electrocardiograms.

A.N. Sinclair & M. Eizenman Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 13
Wednesday
1-3pm
MC 306
2
Robotic control problem formulation, advance dynamic formulation for control application, dynamic model formulations, linear, nonlinear, stability definitions, local and global stability methods, integration of manipulator dynamic equations of motion, differential-algebraic systems.

Pre-requisites: At least one introductory course in control is required and a Mech Eng course in one of either Mechanisms or Vibrations.
Pre-approval of Instructor is REQUIRED in order to take this course. Copies of transcripts must be submitted upon enrollment.
J.K. Mills Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
Tuesday
10am-12noon
BA 2139
3
This course introduces some of the main concepts in nonlinear control systems design, with special emphasis on issues of practical relevance. The first part of the course is a review of basic stability analysis tools for nonlinear systems. The second part introduces a number of continuous time nonlinear controller design approaches, including controller design for systems with input and output nonlinearities, high gain controller design, passivity based controller design, and gain scheduling. The last part of the course covers the design of sampled data nonlinear controllers, which addresses the design of discrete time controllers for nonlinear continuous time systems.

Pre-requisites: MIE404 or equivalent
A. Bilton Annually
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 13
3-6pm
Wednesday
WB 219
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Operations Research

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
A course on the fundamentals of stochastic processes and their application to mathematical models in operational research. Topics discussed will include a review of probability theory, Poisson processes, renewal processes, Markov chains and other advanced processes. Emphasis on applications in inventory, queuing, reliability, repair and maintenance, etc.

Pre-requisites: MIE231 and MIE365, or permission from instructor
Need strong background in probability.
M. Cevik Annually
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 12
9am-12noon
Tuesday
BA B024
2
Rigorous introduction to the theory of linear programming. Simplex method, revised simplex method, duality, dual simplex method. Post-optimality analysis. Interior point methods. Decomposition methods. Network flow algorithms. Maximum flow, shortest path, assignment, min cost flow problems.

Pre-requisites: MIE262, APS1005 or equivalent
Require Linear Algebra and Multi-variate Calculus backround
R. Kwon Annually
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 14
3-6pm
Thursday
MC 306
3
Theory and computational methods of non-linear optimization. Convex sets, convex and concave functions. Unconstrained and Constrained Optimization. Quadratic Programming. Optimality conditions and convergence results. Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. Introduction to penalty and barrier methods. Duality in nonlinear programming.

Pre-requisites: MIE262, APS1005 or equivalent
R. Kwon Annually
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
11am-1pm
Monday
GB 119
4
The objective of the course is to learn analytical models and overview quantitative algorithms for solving engineering and business problems. Data science or analytics is the process of deriving insights from data in order to make optimal decisions. It allows hundreds of companies and governments to save lives, increase profits and minimize resource usage. Considerable attention in the course is devoted to applications of computational and modeling algorithms to finance, risk management, marketing, health care, smart city projects, crime prevention, predictive maintenance, web and social media analytics, personal analytics, etc. Materials in this course are quantitative and computational in nature as well as analytical. Topics include basic statistic, regressions, uncertainty modeling, simulation and optimization modeling, data mining and machine learning, text analytics, artificial intelligence, big data fundamentals and visualizations. IPython and IBM Watson Analytics are modeling and visualization software used in this course. Practical aspects of computational models and case studies in Interactive Python are emphasized.

O. Romanko Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 18
6-9pm
Monday
MC 254
5
Determination of optimal maintenance and replacement practices for components and capital equipment; resources of manpower and machinery required for implementation of maintenance practices; and the use of mathematical models in the development of a maintenance information system. The lectures will be supplemented by case study assignments: E.g., Short-term deterministic replacement; Short-term probabilistic replacement; OREST, PERDEC, AGE/CON, SMS and EXAKT programs.

A.K.S. Jardine Biennially Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 06
5-8pm
Wednesday
MC 252
6
This course takes a practical approach to scheduling problems and solution techniques, motivating the different mathematical definitions of scheduling with real world scheduling systems and problems. Topics covered include: job shop scheduling, timetabling, project scheduling, and the variety of solution approaches including constraint programming, local search, heuristics, and dispatch rules. Also covered will be information engineering aspects of building scheduling systems for real world problems.

Pre-requisites: Please refer to the undergraduate page: here
V. Quan Annually Fall 2017
schedule posted here
7
The purpose of this course is to provide a working knowledge of methods of analysis of problems and of decision making in the face of uncertainty. Topics include decision trees, subjective probability assessment, multi-attribute utility approaches, goal programming, Analytic Hierarchy Process and the psychology of decision making.

Pre-requisites: Please refer to the undergraduate page: here
D. Frances Annually Fall 2017
schedule posted here
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Human Factors & Ergonomics

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
Introduction to principles, methods, and tools for the analysis, design and evaluation of human-centred systems. Consideration of impacts of human perceptual and cognitive factors on the design and use of engineered systems. Basic concepts of workload, human error and reliability, and human factors standards. The human-centred systems design process, including task analysis, user requirements generation, prototyping and usability evaluation. Design of procedures, displays and controls and training systems; design for error prevention and human-computer interaction; design for aging populations.

G. Jamieson Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 13
3-5pm
Wednesday
HS 100
2
The course deals with practical problems associated with the design of experiments in Human Factors research, with an emphasis on the use of statistical packages and data analysis tools. Topics covered will include analysis of variance, non- parametric statistics, balanced and unbalanced block designs (including Latin squares), confidence intervals, etc. Stress is given to practical problems and the intuitive understanding of applied statistics.

M. Chignell Annually
Research
Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 07
4-7pm
Thursday
GB 221
3
An examination of the relation between behavioural science and the design of human-machine systems, with special attention to advanced control room design. Human limitations on perception, attention, memory and decision making, and the design of displays and intelligent machines to supplement them. The human operator in process control and the supervisory control of automated and robotic systems. Laboratory exercises to introduce techniques of evaluating human performance.

Pre-requisites: Please refer to the undergraduate page: here
S. Soung Yee Annually Fall 2017
schedule posted here
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Information Engineering

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
Information Engineering focuses on the representation and use of information in the context of the web. The first part of the course covers the Semantic Web, including XML, RDF, Linked Data, Provenance, Trust and Data Mashup. The second part covers web-based Knowledge Representations, including: Description Logic, OWL, SWRL, and Ontologies.

M. Fox Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 11
3-6pm
Monday
UC 330
2
This course provides students with an understanding of the role of a decision support system in an organization, its components, and the theories and techniques used to construct them. The course will focus on information analysis to support organizational decision-making needs and will cover topics including information retrieval, descriptive and predictive modeling using machine learning and data mining, recommendation systems, and effective visualization and communication of analytical results.

S. Sanner Annually Fall 2017
co-taught with MIE451, schedule posted here
GB 248
3
The course objective is to familiarize students with the principles and methods of systems engineering. Topics include system level thinking in the product development process, the morphology of system level design, the conceptual design loop, system level multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO), system architecture studies, future trends, system level technology readiness levels, system risk assessment, product launch decision making, and system level validation and risk reduction techniques, using examples and applications from industries such as aerospace. The course will prepare students who are or will be involved in high technology complex systems, and the preliminary and detailed design of products. The course will be delivered using a mixture of formal presentations, informal discussions, and applications of key aspects of systems engineering. Quizzes, assignments, and workshops will allow students to put theory into practice.

N. Youssef Annually Fall 2017
Start: Sept. 20
5-8pm
Wednesday
GB 248
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Reading Courses

# Course Instructor Type Information
1
Students may take only one reading course for credit in a degree program, unless special authorization has been granted by the Graduate Studies Committee.

Supervisor
2
Students may take only one reading course for credit in a degree program, unless special authorization has been granted by the Graduate Studies Committee.

Supervisor
3
Students may take only one reading course for credit in a degree program, unless special authorization has been granted by the Graduate Studies Committee.

Supervisor
4
Students may take only one reading course for credit in a degree program, unless special authorization has been granted by the Graduate Studies Committee.

Supervisor
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