Faculty

Cristina H. Amon, ScD, P.Eng., FAAAS, FASEE, FASME, FCAE, FCSME, FEIC, FIEEE, FRSC, NAE

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Dean, Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering
Alumni Chair in Bioengineering

Research: Fluid dynamics; nano scale thermal transport; energy systems; electronics cooling; hemodynamics and transport in biological systems; engineering design and education.

Laboratory: Advanced Thermal/fluid Optimization, Modelling and Simulation (ATOMS) Lab

Email: dean@ecf.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-3131 | Office: BA 2007

Research Areas

  1. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering
  2. Biomedical Engineering
  3. Energy and Environmental Engineering

Biosketch

Cristina Amon is Dean and Alumni Professor in Bioengineering at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering. Under her leadership, Canada’s #1 ranked engineering school has become a global hub for inter-disciplinary research and education known for its strategic Faculty-wide initiatives, cross-Faculty centres and institutes, and innovative undergraduate and graduate programming. Her commitment to outreach and diversity has set a new standard for Engineering schools worldwide: the number of women faculty members at U of T Engineering has doubled in the last decade and the Faculty celebrated an historic 40% women first-year undergraduate enrolment for its second consecutive year in 2017.

Prior to her deanship at U of T, Amon was the Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Institute for Complex Engineered Systems at Carnegie Mellon (until 2006). She received her master’s and doctorate degrees from MIT in 1988. Her research pioneered multidisciplinary thermal designs and made ground-breaking innovations to transient thermal management, optimization algorithms for renewable energy, nanoscale transport in semiconductors and biological systems. Her scholarly contributions are published in 16 book chapters and over 350 articles in education and research literature.

She has been inducted into the Canadian Academy of Engineering, Hispanic Engineer Hall of Fame, National Academy of Engineering, Royal Academy of Spain and Royal Society of Canada, and elected fellow of all major professional societies in her fields. Additional accolades include the ASEE Westinghouse Medal, ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award and SWE Achievement Award, the highest honour.

Professor Amon received the Engineers Canada Award for the Support of Women in 2010, was named one of the YWCA’s Women of Distinction in 2011 and one of Canada’s 25 Most Influential Women in 2012, and received the Ontario Professional Engineers Gold Medal in 2015 – the most prestigious honour for engineering public service, technical excellence and professional leadership.

Learn more about Dean Amon and U of T Engineering.
Sanjeev Chandra, PhD, P.Eng., FAAAS, FASME

Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Heat transfer; fluid mechanics; thermal spray coating; spray painting; heat exchangers; heat pipes; impact of liquid drops; ink jet printing; waste heat recovery, electronic cooling.

Laboratory: Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies (CACT)

Email: chandra@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-5742 | Office: BA8254

Research Areas

  1. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering
  2. Energy and Environmental Engineering

Biosketch

Sanjeev Chandra is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering (MIE) at the University of Toronto, which he joined in 1990. He received his BTech from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (1981) his MS from Vanderbilt University (1983) and PhD from Cornell University (1990). He has served as the Acting Chair, Associate Chair (undergraduate studies), Associate Chair (graduate studies) and Vice-Chair of the MIE Department, and Acting Vice-Dean (undergraduate studies) of the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering.

Professor Chandra is known internationally for his research on the dynamics of droplets and sprays. His research spans the areas of combustion, fluid mechanics, heat transfer and materials science and has also been applied in spray coating, spray cooling, fuel combustion and waste heat recovery. Prof. Chandra has published over 200 papers in referred journals and international conference proceedings. He teaches courses in thermodynamics and heat transfer and has served as visiting professor at the University of Limoges (France) Korea University (S. Korea), University of Bremen (Germany) and the University of Darmstadt (Germany).

In 2015 Professor Chandra was awarded the Jules Stachiewicz medal for Heat Transfer by the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering. In 2010 he was awarded the The Brockhouse Canada Prize for Interdisciplinary Research, awarded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada to recognize outstanding collaborative research. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).
Iain G. Currie, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME

Professor Emeritus, Mechanical Engineering

Email: currie@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-0343 | Office: MC308

Research Areas

  1. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering

Biosketch

Iain G. Currie holds a Bachelors degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Strathclyde, a Masters degree from the University of British Columbia, and a PhD from the California Institute of Technology. He has taught fluid mechanics at the undergraduate and graduate levels at the University of Toronto since he joined the academic staff in 1966. During the period 1993 to 1998 he served as the Chair of the Department. This period includes the merger of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Department of Industrial Engineering in 1996 to form the present Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering.

Dr. Currie’s research involves fluid structure interactions, and recently he has become involved in studying low Reynolds number flows involving both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. He is the founder and Director of the Flow Measurements Laboratory, a facility which utilizes LDA and PIV flow measurement techniques. He is the author of the well known graduate text entitled Fundamental Mechanics of Fluids, the 4th edition of which was published by CRC Press in 2012.
Chul B. Park, PhD, P.Eng., FRSC, FCAE, FKAST, FNAEK, FAAAS, FASME, FCSME, FEIC, FSPE

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
University of Toronto Distinguished Professor of Microcellular Engineered Plastics

Research: plastic foaming technology; fundamental understanding of foaming phenomena; computational modelling of foaming; super high R value foams; sound insulation foams, biodegradable foams; environmentally safeblowing agents.

Laboratory: Microcellular Plastics Manufacturing Laboratory (MPML)

Email: park@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-3053 | Office: RS210A

Research Areas

  1. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering
  2. Advanced Manufacturing and Materials Engineering

Biosketch

Chul B. Park is a world leader in the development of innovative, cost-effective technologies for the foamed plastics. Dr. Park has been extensively involved in industrial projects both in consulting and research contracts on various foam processes including microcellular processing, inert gas-injection processing, rotational foam molding, wood-fiber composites, and open-cell foams.

Since 1993, he directed the Microcellular Plastics Manufacturing Laboratory at the University of Toronto and has been involved in pioneering work on the concepts of microcellular foaming. The laboratory is recognized as the leading facility in the world for research and development of microcellular plastic foams.

Dr. Park’s innovative research in this area indicates that the successful production of microcellular automotive parts could have a major impact on industry. Metallic components, for example, could be replaced with plastic ones, resulting in crucial weight reduction; the introduction of microcellular foams could further reduce part weights, as well as production and operational costs. These weight reductions could also contribute to improved fuel economy and reduced CO2 emissions.

For over a decade, he has led the Consortium for cellular and Microcellular Plastics (CCMCP) with 20+ industrial sponsors from Canada and around the world. The Consortium has developed state-of-the-art technologies for manufacturing process and production in plastic foaming, which have been widely adopted by a large number of companies in their production.

In recognition of his outstanding research achievements, he has received numerous honors and awards in his career. The recent awards include: the NSERC Strategic Network Grant ($5M) in 2010, the Julian C Smith Award from the Engineering Institute of Canada in 2010, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2010, Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2012, the C.N. Downing Award from the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering in 2012, the M. Eugene Merchant Manufacturing Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers / Society of Manufacturing Engineers in 2012, and Fellow of the Korean Academy of Science of Technology in 2012.

Professor Emeritus, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Thermodynamics and kinetics: gas and vapour adsorption kinetics; surface tension of solids; evaporation and condensation kinetics; surface tension-driven flow; energy transport at liquid-vapour and solid-liquid interfaces.

Laboratory: Thermodynamics and Kinetics Laboratory (TKL)

Email: ward@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-4807 | Office: MC309

Research Areas

  1. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  2. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering

Biosketch

Charles Albert Ward received his BSc from the University of Texas, Arlington, and his doctorate from Northwestern University. He joined the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Toronto in 1967, and was promoted to Professor in 1977.

Currently, he is the Director of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics Laboratory. A theory for predicting the rate of molecular transport across phase boundaries—Statistical Rate Theory—was developed in his lab. It has been cited in the open literature over 400 times. He and his students have published over one hundred papers in peer-reviewed journals. His studies of interfacial kinetics led to the measurement of a temperature discontinuity at the liquid-vapour interface during evaporation and to the measurement of a new property of water: the surface thermal capacity. This property defines the energy transport by surface-tension-driven flow.

The Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering (CSME) has recognized his research contributions. In 1988 he received the Robert W. Angus Medal in recognition of a paper on surface science and in 2008 he received the Jules Stachiewiez Medal for his contributions to heat transfer.