Faculty

Cristina H. Amon, ScD, P.Eng., FAAAS, FASEE, FASME, FCAE, FCSME, FEIC, FIEEE, FRSC, NAE

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Dean, Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering
Alumni Chair in Bioengineering

Research: Fluid dynamics; nano scale thermal transport; energy systems; electronics cooling; hemodynamics and transport in biological systems; engineering design and education.

Laboratory: Advanced Thermal/fluid Optimization, Modelling and Simulation (ATOMS) Lab

Email: dean@ecf.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-3131 | Office: BA 2007

Research Areas

  1. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering
  2. Biomedical Engineering
  3. Energy and Environmental Engineering

Biosketch

Cristina Amon has been the Dean of the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and Alumni Professor of Bioengineering in Mechanical & Industrial Engineering since 2006. She received her Mechanical Engineering diploma from Simón Bolívar University, and her MS and ScD degrees in 1988 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Prior to her leadership at the University of Toronto, she was the Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor and Director of the Institute for Complex Engineered Systems at Carnegie Mellon University.

A pioneer in the development of Computational Fluid Dynamics for formulating thermal design solutions subject to multidisciplinary competing constraints, she conducts research in nanoscale thermal transport in semiconductors, energy systems and bioengineered devices.

Dean Amon serves on the BoD of MKS Instruments Inc., a leading global provider for advanced manufacturing of semiconductor devices, energy generation and electro-optical products. She is chair of the research committee of NCDEAS (National Council of Deans of Engineering and Applied Science), past chair of the Global Engineering Deans Council, and has served on advisory boards for several institutions including Stanford, UCLA, UIUC and Waterloo.

Cristina Amon has received numerous professional and leadership awards, including the ASME Gustus Larson Memorial Award, ASEE Westinghouse Medal, ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award, and the Society of Women Engineers' Achievement Award. In 2012 she was recognized as one of Canada's most Influential Women. She was inducted to four academies: Canadian Academy of Engineering, Spanish Royal Academy, Royal Society of Canada and the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. She is an elected fellow of all major professional societies in her field and has authored over 350 refereed articles in education and research literature.
Nasser Ashgriz, PhD, JD, P.Eng., FAAAS

Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Fluid and thermal systems, spray and multiphase flows; energy, combustion, and nuclear engineering; microfluidics, micro-droplet jetting; bio-fluid engineering and vestibular systems.

Laboratory: Multiphase Flow and Spray Systems Laboratory (MUSSL)

Email: ashgriz@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-3408 | Office: MC229

Research Areas

  1. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  2. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering

Biosketch

Dr. Nasser Ashgriz is a professor of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto. Prior to U of T, he was a Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York. He obtained his BS (1979), MS (1981), and PhD (1984) degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, where he was the recipient of two Bennet Prize awards (1981, 1983) in recognition of outstanding scholarly work in Mechanical Engineering.

He has been a visiting scientist at several national laboratories including NASA Lewis Research Center and Phillips Laboratory at Edwards Air Force Base. He has received several awards including the Ralph Teetor Award from Society of Automotive Engineers (1988), The Best Picture Award, from the American Physical Society (1988), the Best Paper Award, from the Combustion Institute (1992), and TOKTEN Award from the United Nations Development Program (1995). He is also the holder of a patent on MultiOrifice Impulsed Spray Generator, Patent No. 4,667,877. Dr. Ashgriz has been a member and has held offices in various professional societies (e.g., ASME K-11 Committee, "Heat Transfer in Fire and Combustion Systems," ASME Winter Annual Meeting, American Physical Society, the Combustion Institute, and the Institute for Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems).
Aimy Bazylak, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME

Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Canada Research Chair in Thermofluidics for Clean Energy
Director, Institute for Sustainable Energy (ISE)

Research: Multiphase flow through porous media; microfluidics; thermofluids; clean energy applications; polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs); PEM electrolyzers, microfluidic fuel cells; carbon sequestration.

Laboratory: Thermofluids for Energy and Advanced Materials (TEAM) Laboratory
Computational Science & Engineering Discussion Group: https://arrow.utias.utoronto.ca/ccse/

Email: abazylak@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-5031 | Office: MC227

Research Areas

  1. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  2. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering

Biosketch

Aimy Bazylak received her Bachelor’s degree in Engineering Physics from the University of Saskatchewan, and her MASc and PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Victoria, where she specialized in numerical and experimental investigations of microfluidic and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Professor Bazylak is the principal investigator of the TEAM Lab, where she leads a talented team of postgraduate researchers. She is the Director of the Institute for Sustainable Energy (ISE) and also the Associate Director for the NSERC CREATE Program in Distributed Generation for Remote Communities (DGRC).

Her research interests include transport phenomena in PEMFCs, PEM electrolyzers, microfluidic fuel cells, multiphase flow in porous media, clean energy technologies, and energy sustainability. In 2011, Prof. Bazylak received the I.W. Smith Award from the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering, and in 2012 she received an Early Researcher Award from the Government of Ontario.
Amy Bilton, PhD, P.Eng.

Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Associate Director of the Center for Global Engineering (CGEN)

Research: Energy systems; water purification and desalination; design for the developing world; computer-aided design methods; design optimization under uncertainty; control system design.

Laboratory: Water and Energy Research Laboratory (WERL)

Email: bilton@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-0622 | Office: MC311

Research Areas

  1. Robotics, Mechatronics and Instrumentation
  2. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  3. Applied Mechanics and Design

Biosketch

Amy Bilton joined the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering as an Assistant Professor in January 2014. She completed her BASc at the University of Toronto in Engineering Science (Aerospace Option) and her MS at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Aeronautics and Astronautics. After completing her MS, Dr. Bilton worked as a Systems Engineer at Pratt & Whitney Canada and Honeywell Aerospace. She then returned MIT where she completed her PhD in Aeronautics and Astronautics and continued as a Postdoctoral Associate.

Dr. Bilton's research lies at the intersection of developing theoretical design and control techniques and developing new physical electromechanical systems. Applications of her research include water purification systems, desalination systems, and renewable energy. Her current work is focused on deployment of a newly developed solar-powered water purification system in the developing world.
Markus Bussmann, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Chair, Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

Research: CFD and thermofluids modelling; interfacial and multiphase flows; wetting and contact lines; heat transfer and phase change. Industrial applications include boiler fouling and ash deposition; industrial melting and dissolution processes; oil/water/solids separation.

Laboratory: Modeling Materials Processing Laboratory

Email: bussmann@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-7198 | Office: MC136

Research Areas

  1. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering
  2. Energy and Environmental Engineering

Biosketch

Markus Bussmann is Chair and Professor in Mechanical & Industrial Engineering (MIE) at the University of Toronto. Professor Bussmann holds BASc (1987) and MASc (1990) degrees from the University of Waterloo, and a PhD (2000) from the University of Toronto. He then spent 2½ years as a postdoc and staff member at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, joined U of T in 2002, and served as Graduate Coordinator of MIE from 2009-2013. He has also served as Vice-Dean of Graduate Studies for the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering.

Professor Bussmann’s research interests focus on the development and application of models for interfacial flow, heat transfer, and phase change associated with various materials processes, often in collaboration with other researchers. Applications include the control of boiler fouling, melting and dissolution processes in molten metals, fluid/fluid/particle separation and coating processes, and heat exchanger design. Professor Bussmann was named a fellow of the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering in 2011.
Sanjeev Chandra, PhD, P.Eng., FAAAS, FASME

Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Heat transfer; fluid mechanics; thermal spray coating; spray painting; heat exchangers; heat pipes; impact of liquid drops; ink jet printing; waste heat recovery, electronic cooling.

Laboratory: Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies (CACT)

Email: chandra@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-5742 | Office: BA8254

Research Areas

  1. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering
  2. Energy and Environmental Engineering

Biosketch

Sanjeev Chandra is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering (MIE) at the University of Toronto, which he joined in 1990. He received his BTech from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (1981) his MS from Vanderbilt University (1983) and PhD from Cornell University (1990). He has served as the Acting Chair, Associate Chair (undergraduate studies), Associate Chair (graduate studies) and Vice-Chair of the MIE Department, and Acting Vice-Dean (undergraduate studies) of the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering.

Professor Chandra is known internationally for his research on the dynamics of droplets and sprays. His research spans the areas of combustion, fluid mechanics, heat transfer and materials science and has also been applied in spray coating, spray cooling, fuel combustion and waste heat recovery. Prof. Chandra has published over 200 papers in referred journals and international conference proceedings. He teaches courses in thermodynamics and heat transfer and has served as visiting professor at the University of Limoges (France) Korea University (S. Korea), University of Bremen (Germany) and the University of Darmstadt (Germany).

In 2015 Professor Chandra was awarded the Jules Stachiewicz medal for Heat Transfer by the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering. In 2010 he was awarded the The Brockhouse Canada Prize for Interdisciplinary Research, awarded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada to recognize outstanding collaborative research. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).
Olivera Kesler, ScD, P.Eng.

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Canada Research Chair in Fuel Cell Materials and Manufacturing

Research: Solid oxide fuel cells; fuel cell materials and manufacturing; graded and multi-layered materials; plasma spray and sol gel processing; increasing reliability; durability and decreasing cost of clean energy conversion technologies.

Laboratory: Fuel Cell Materials and Manufacturing Lab

Email: kesler@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-3835 | Office: MC332

Research Areas

  1. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  2. Advanced Manufacturing and Materials Engineering

Biosketch

Olivera Kesler joined the University of Toronto in 2007 and initiated the Fuel Cell Materials and Manufacturing Laboratory, FCMML. The goal of all of the research work in FCMML is to enhance environmental sustainability by developing cleaner energy conversion technologies that reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions compared to combustion-based power generation methods. Research projects are conceived with the goal of tackling the largest challenges preventing the widespread use of fuel cell technologies – cost, durability, and reliability. The ultimate objective of the work is to facilitate the widest and fastest possible adoption of cleaner energy conversion technologies in order to maximize their environmental benefit.

The main focus of the research in FCMML is on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology. SOFCs are the most efficient known energy conversion device for the production of electricity from a variety of fuels, including renewable biomass, hydrogen, or natural gas, with no smog-forming emissions. However, their use remains severely limited by high costs, as well as by low durability and reliability. Current projects are aimed at drastically lowering the cost and improving the durability of fuel cells through the use of new materials and processing techniques to produce fuel cells more rapidly using a process that is easily scaleable for mass production. Work is also focused on understanding the electrochemical performance and degradation behaviour of SOFCs, in order to develop strategies to increase their durability.
Andreas Mandelis, PhD, LEL, FRSC, FCAE, FAAAS, FASME, FAPS, FSPIE

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Diffusion-Wave Sciences and Technologies
Director, CADIFT

Research: Thermal and optoelectronic non-destructive techniques (thermophysics and photovoltaics); biothermophotonic and biophotoacoustic imaging science and instrumentation; cancer, dental caries, bone and blood glucose diagnostics.

Laboratory: Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave and Photoacoustic Technologies (CADIPT)

Email: mandelis@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-5106 | Office: MC334

Research Areas

  1. Biomedical Engineering
  2. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  3. Advanced Manufacturing and Materials Engineering
  4. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering

Biosketch

Professor Andreas Mandelis is a Full Professor of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering; Electrical & Computer Engineering; and the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto. Dr. Mandelis’ fundamental research interests are focused on studies of physical processes in condensed and biological matter as they impact instrumentation science and signal generation. Examples are thermophysics, non-radiative and radiative physics of electronic, optical and biomedical materials, photoacoustic, photothermal and diffusion-wave phenomena in manufactured, electronic, biological and photonic media. Current interests include building theoretical and experimental system foundations of biothermophotonic and biophotoacoustic transport phenomena and frequency-domain instrumentation for imaging in hard (dental, bone) and soft tissues, novel biosensors and high-performance diagnostic imaging techniques. Culminating in his work on the foundations of the field of photoacoustic and diffusion waves in matter, his applied research interests span all aspects of instrumentation and measurement development for photoacoustic, photothermal, and diffusion-wave high-precision, high-dynamic-range analytical techniques leading to advanced non-destructive (non-invasive) inspection and monitoring technologies. Current application examples are in the fields of alternative energy conversion devices (e.g. solar cells, nano-optoelectronic devices), industrial manufactured products (steels, metal composites) and biomedical and dental diagnostics with major focus on advanced dynamic imaging instrumentation.

Professor Mandelis is the Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Diffusion-Wave Sciences and Technologies and a Fellow in the Academy of Sciences of The Royal Society of Canada. He has been selected for the Alexander von Humboldt Professor Award twice (in 2003 and 2012). He is the 2007 (inaugural) recipient of the Ontario Premier’s Discovery Award in Science and Engineering. He received the ASME 2009 Yeram Touloukian Award (and Medal) in Thermophysics, the Senior Prize of the International Photoacoustic and Photothermal Association, and the Canadian Association of Physicists (CAP) Medal for Outstanding Achievement in Industrial and Applied Physics. In 2010 he was awarded a Killam Research Fellowship from the Canada Council for the Arts. He is the recipient of the American Physical Society’s (APS) 2012 Joseph F. Keithley Award for Advances in Measurement Science and of the CAP-INO Medal for Outstanding Achievement in Applied Photonics. In 2013 he was selected as one of 10 recipients of the 2013 University of Toronto Inventors of the Year Award. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering, the APS, the SPIE, the AAAS and the ASME.
A. Wilhelm Neumann, Dr.Rer.Nat.

Professor Emeritus, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Thermodynamics of contact angles, wetting and adhesion generalization of the classical theory of capillarity to high curvature situations; Applications of Digital Image Analysis and Processing to interfacial tension and other surface science problems; Modelling of cell and protein adhesion to synthetic and natural biomaterials; Applications of surface thermodynamics to biotechnological problems.

Laboratory: Applied Surface Thermodynamics (LAST) Laboratory

Email: neumann@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-3052 | Office: BA8131B

Research Areas

  1. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  2. Biomedical Engineering

Biosketch

Dr. Neumann has received his Dr.rer.nat in Chemical Physics, at University of Mainz, Germany in 1962, his habilitation in Physical Chemistry of Surfaces, at University of Stuttgart, Germany, 1972. He is currently Professor Emeritus of the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto.

During his career he has produced approximately 450 publications. His research interests include: Fundamental surface thermodynamic studies from both experimental and theoretical points of view, including: contact angle phenomena and surface energetic; Development of novel methodologies in applied surface thermodynamics: Application of image analysis and computer-aided techniques in measurements of surface thermodynamic properties such as surface tension, contact angle, and line tension; Applications of thermodynamics to process of biomedical relevance: Novel methodology for the energetic characterization of biosurfaces, most recently in lung physiology, specifically the role and function of lung surfactants.
Li Shu, PhD, P.Eng.

Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Creativity in conceptual design; Systematic identification and application of biological analogies in biomimetic (biologically inspired) design; Identifying and overcoming obstacles to personal environmentally significant behavior.

Laboratory: SHUlab

Email: shu@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-3028 | Office: MC420

Research Areas

  1. Information Engineering
  2. Human Factors/Ergonomics
  3. Applied Mechanics and Design
  4. Energy and Environmental Engineering

Biosketch

Professor Shu obtained graduate degrees in Mechanical Engineering from MIT in the fields of human-computer interaction in computer-aided design (SM) and design for remanufacture as an approach to environmentally responsible product design (PhD). Professor Shu’s current research focus is designing products that enable environmentally conscious (also known as pro-environmental or sustainable) behavior in consumers.

Professor Shu is active in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), serving as the DTM (Design Theory and Methodology) Committee Chair in 2009, DTM Conference Chair in 2008, and DTM Program Chair in 2007. Professor Shu is a fellow of the CIRP (International Academy for Production Engineering Research), and was awarded the CIRP F.W. Taylor Medal Award in 2004. Professor Shu also served on the Advisory Board of the Design Society from 2003-2009 and is on the advisory board/program committee for several international design conferences and editorial board for several journals.

Professor Shu has spent research stays at AlliedSignal Aerospace Canada Inc., in Etobicoke, Ontario; Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York; Naval Ocean Systems Center, San Diego, California; Naval Training Systems Center, Orlando, Florida; and the Technical University of Denmark.
David Sinton, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME, FASME, FEIC

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Canada Research Chair in Microfluidics and Energy, E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellow

Research: Research: Energy; fluid mechanics; microfluidics, nanofluidics, and optofluidics; bioenergy; carbon management; enhanced oil recovery; diagnostics and fertility.

Laboratory: Sinton Lab - Fluidics & Energy

Email: sinton@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-1623 | Office: MC226

Research Areas

  1. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  2. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering

Biosketch

David Sinton is a Professor and Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Microfluidics and Energy at the University of Toronto. He is currently an NSERC E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellow, before which he was the Associate Chair of Research in Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, as well as the Interim Vice-Dean of research in the Faculty of Applied Science. He is a co-founder and the CTO of Interface Fluidics Ltd, a start-up focused on improving the environmental and economic performance of current energy operations. Prior to joining the University of Toronto, Dr. Sinton was an Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair (Tier 2) at the University of Victoria, and a Visiting Associate Professor at Cornell University. He received a BASc from University of Toronto, MEng from McGill University and PhD from University of Toronto. Dr. Sinton’s research interests are in fluidics and energy. This research involves the study and application of small scale fluid mechanics (microfluidics, nanofluidics, and optofluidics) for use in energy systems and analysis. He became a Fellow of the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering in 2012, a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 2013, a Fellow of the Engineering Institute of Canada in 2015, the University of Toronto McLean Senior Fellow in 2013, and an NSERC E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellow in 2016.
Pierre E. Sullivan, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME

Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Turbulent flows; analytical models based on organized structures in steady and nonsteady flows; turbulent flow in spark ignition engines with laser doppler velocimetry; fibre slurries in high turbulence environments; development of improved PIV and PTV algorithms.

Laboratory: Turbulence Research Lab

Email: sullivan@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-3110 | Office: MC225

Research Areas

  1. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering
  2. Applied Mechanics and Design
  3. Biomedical Engineering
  4. Energy and Environmental Engineering

Biosketch

Professor Pierre Sullivan's research interests span flow phenomena, energy conservation and micro-scale electrohydrodynamics. His work has examined novel physical insight into the area of micro-scale jets and electrowetting on dielectric droplet motion. In aerodynamic control, was initiated with acoustic control leading to the current work installing synthetic jets directly onto the wing. This work is focused on low-speed (1-5 kW) wind turbines and micro-air vehicles. This work has included difficult near-wall measurements, flow visualization and careful analysis to describe the actions of the two control mechanisms.

Most interestingly, his group has found a dependence on Reynolds number that allowed the identification of fundamental frequencies important to the shear layer vortices. This improves control schemes for the devices. In addition to this, through a number of collaborations he has embarked on an experimental and numerical study of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. He has developed a unique well-validated particle image velocimetry dataset that is much larger than any previously available and has made this available as an open dataset. This work has recently been modeled with Large Eddy Simulation to fully characterize difficult to measure turbulent stresses and statistics.

Professor Sullivan was named fellow of the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering (CSME) in 2012. He completed his BSME and MSME from Clarkson University in 1988 and 1991 respectively, and PhD in Mechanical Engineering from Queen's University in 1995.
Murray J. Thomson, PhD, P.Eng. FEIC, FCSME, FCAE

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Director, NSERC CREATE Program in Clean Combustion Engines

Research: Alternative energy; combustion experiments and modelling; biofuel flames and engines; air pollution formation and control; spectroscopy and optical sensors.

Laboratory: Combustion Research Laboratory (CRL)

Email: murray.thomson@utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-573-1022 | Office: MC335

Research Areas

  1. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  2. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering

Biosketch

Dr. Murray Thomson is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto where he is the Director of the Combustion Research Laboratory. He is also cross-appointed with the Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry. He received a BEng from McGill University (1986) and PhD from University of California, Berkeley (1994).

Professor Thomson is the Director of the NSERC CREATE Program in Clean Combustion Engines. He is on the organizing committee of the biennial International Sooting Flame Workshop, and the Board of Directors of the Canadian Section of the Combustion Institute. He is a member of the Research Management Committee and a Theme Leader of the BiofuelNet Canada NSERC National Centre of Excellence.

Professor Thomson’s research is in the area of combustion with a focus on pollutant formation, biofuels, combustion modeling and optical sensors. He has supervised the thesis research of 61 graduate students and published 62 journal publications. He has developed 4 sensors that had patent applications and were commercialised with Canadian partner companies (Tenova, Unisearch and Resonance). He is a Fellow of the Engineering Institute of Canada (EIC) and the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering (CSME).
Marianne Touchie, PhD, P.Eng.

Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Building science; building energy use; indoor environmental quality; thermal comfort; energy modeling; building environmental monitoring; building retrofits; occupant behavior; heat pump technology; low-energy buildings.

Laboratory: Building Energy and Indoor Environment (BEIE) Lab

Email: touchie@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-5919 | Office: GB314B

Research Areas

  1. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  2. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering

Biosketch

Marianne Touchie joined the University of Toronto as an Assistant Professor in July 2016 and is cross-appointed in the Departments of Civil Engineering and Mechanical & Industrial Engineering. She completed her BASc (2009) and PhD (2014) in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Toronto. Upon completion of her PhD, Dr. Touchhie became the Building Research Manager at the Toronto Atmospheric Fund and was also a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto. Dr. Touchie’s research focuses on improving the energy performance and indoor environmental quality of existing buildings to make them more comfortable, healthy and sustainable through comprehensive retrofits. This work includes monitoring and characterizing building energy performance and environmental parameters such as temperature, mean radiant temperature, relative humidity, air velocity and leakage, lighting levels and contaminant concentrations to determine the influence of potential retrofit approaches, both active and passive. Much of her research has been in the multi-unit residential sector and particularly social housing buildings. Dr. Touchie is also the Academic Director and Chair of the Building Science Specialist of Ontario (BSSO) Committee for the Ontario Building Envelope Council (OBEC) and the Vice-Chair for the ASHRAE Technical Committee 2.1 Physiology and Human Environment.
James S. Wallace, PhD, P.Eng., FSAE, FCSME, FEIC

Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Energy Studies; environmental engineering; alternative fuels; reducing engine exhaust emissions; energy system studies; clean energy technologies and the integration of energy conversion devices into total energy systems; investigations of hydrogen-fueled engines.

Laboratory: Engine Research and Development Laboratory (ERDL)

Email: wallace@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-4899 | Office: MC421

Research Areas

  1. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  2. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering

Biosketch

Professor Jim Wallace is Director of the Engine Research and Development Laboratory at the University of Toronto. He has more than 30 years of experience conducting research on the topics of internal combustion engines, combustion, and fuels. The engine lab specializes in the combustion of alternative fuels, including biodiesel, bio-oil, and biogas, methanol, natural gas, propane and hydrogen in spark ignition and diesel engines. The focus of the work is on reducing engine exhaust emissions. Current research ranges from fundamental ignition studies of natural gas injected in diesel engines, a study of the effect of ethanol-gasoline blends on GDI engine PM emissions, and a study of the potential health benefits of using diesel particulate filters. He was made a Fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) in 2001 for his contributions in the area of alternative fuels. He is also a Fellow of the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering (CSME) and the Engineering Institute of Canada (EIC) and received the Robert W. Angus Medal from the CSME in 2011.

Professor Wallace served as Chair of the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering from 1998-2003. He received the 2011 Faculty Teaching Award from the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and the 2012 President’s Teaching Award from the University of Toronto. He is a member of the University of Toronto’s Teaching Academy.

Professor Emeritus, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Thermodynamics and kinetics: gas and vapour adsorption kinetics; surface tension of solids; evaporation and condensation kinetics; surface tension-driven flow; energy transport at liquid-vapour and solid-liquid interfaces.

Laboratory: Thermodynamics and Kinetics Laboratory (TKL)

Email: ward@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-4807 | Office: MC309

Research Areas

  1. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  2. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering

Biosketch

Charles Albert Ward received his BSc from the University of Texas, Arlington, and his doctorate from Northwestern University. He joined the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Toronto in 1967, and was promoted to Professor in 1977.

Currently, he is the Director of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics Laboratory. A theory for predicting the rate of molecular transport across phase boundaries—Statistical Rate Theory—was developed in his lab. It has been cited in the open literature over 400 times. He and his students have published over one hundred papers in peer-reviewed journals. His studies of interfacial kinetics led to the measurement of a temperature discontinuity at the liquid-vapour interface during evaporation and to the measurement of a new property of water: the surface thermal capacity. This property defines the energy transport by surface-tension-driven flow.

The Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering (CSME) has recognized his research contributions. In 1988 he received the Robert W. Angus Medal in recognition of a paper on surface science and in 2008 he received the Jules Stachiewiez Medal for his contributions to heat transfer.