Faculty

Craig A. Simmons, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
U of T Distinguished Professor of Mechanobiology

Research: Cellular mechanobiology; cell, tissue and biomaterial micromechanics; design and application of microdevices that mimic complex physiological environments.

Laboratory: Simmons Lab for Cellular Mechanobiology

Email: simmons@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-0548 | Office: 661 University‎, 14th floor

Research Areas

  1. Biomedical Engineering
  2. Applied Mechanics and Design

Biosketch

Craig Simmons is the University of Toronto Distinguished Professor of Mechanobiology in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering. He also serves as the Scientific Director of the University of Toronto Translational Biology and Engineering Program in the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research.

Craig received his B.Sc. (Eng.) from the University of Guelph (1991), S.M. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1994), and Ph.D. from the University of Toronto (2000). He then completed an NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan (2000-2002) and an American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania (2002-2004) before returning to the University of Toronto faculty in 2005.

Craig leads a talented group of researchers and students to discover new treatments for heart valve, heart muscle, and blood vessel diseases, including strategies to regenerate cardiovascular tissues using stem cells and biomaterials. His group also creates novel microfluidic platforms to model vascularized tissues and organs for improved drug testing.

Craig was the Canada Research Chair in Mechanobiology from 2006-2016 and is the recipient of numerous research awards, including the Ontario Early Researcher Award, the McCharles Prize and McLean Award from the University of Toronto, the 2015 CP Has Heart Cardiovascular Award from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, and the 2017 Professional Engineers of Ontario Research & Development Engineering Medal. He has also been recognized for exceptional teaching by the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering with the 2009 Early Career Teaching Award, the 2015 Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Teaching Award, and the 2016 Faculty Teaching Award, and with the 2017 Northrop Frye Award awarded by the University of Toronto for excellence in linking teaching and research.
David A. Steinman, PhD, P.Eng., FASME

Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Hemodynamic factors in cardiovascular disease; integration of medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD); simulation of medical imaging; flow visualization; intersection of science and engineering with the arts and humanities.

Laboratory: Biomedical Simulation Laboratory (BSL)

Email: steinman@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-7781 | Office: MC333

Research Areas

  1. Biomedical Engineering

Biosketch

Professor Steinman completed his doctoral studies in Computational Hemodynamics at the University of Toronto in 1993. From 1993-1996 he did postdoctoral work in Magnetic Resonance Imaging at the Robarts Research Institute in London, Ontario, after which he became a Robarts Scientist and Assistant then Associate Professor of Medical Biophysics and Diagnostic Radiology & Nuclear Medicine at the University of Western Ontario. In 2005 he returned to the University of Toronto, where he is currently a Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering and the Institute of Biomedical Engineering.

Professor Steinman is recognized as a pioneer in the integration of medical imaging and computational modelling, and their use in the study of cardiovascular disease development, diagnosis and treatment. His current research focuses on improving rupture risk prediction for cerebral aneurysms; elucidating the nature of turbulence in blood flow; developing an interactive ultrasound training simulator; and developing ‘art-inspired’ flow visualization techniques. He has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed journal articles and conference papers, and is the co-founder of the widely-used Vascular Modelling ToolKit. He was previously an Associate Editor for the ASME Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, and currently serves on the review boards of several international journals. He was Chair of the Fluids Committee for ASME's Bioengineering Division, and in 2012 was elected Fellow of the ASME. Continuously since 1998, Professor Steinman has been the recipient of competitive salary awards from the Heart & Stroke Foundation, and currently holds a Mid-Career Investigator Award.
Pierre E. Sullivan, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME

Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Turbulent flows; analytical models based on organized structures in steady and nonsteady flows; turbulent flow in spark ignition engines with laser doppler velocimetry; fibre slurries in high turbulence environments; development of improved PIV and PTV algorithms.

Laboratory: Turbulence Research Lab

Email: sullivan@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-3110 | Office: MC225

Research Areas

  1. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering
  2. Applied Mechanics and Design
  3. Biomedical Engineering
  4. Energy and Environmental Engineering

Biosketch

Professor Pierre Sullivan's research interests span flow phenomena, energy conservation and micro-scale electrohydrodynamics. His work has examined novel physical insight into the area of micro-scale jets and electrowetting on dielectric droplet motion. In aerodynamic control, was initiated with acoustic control leading to the current work installing synthetic jets directly onto the wing. This work is focused on low-speed (1-5 kW) wind turbines and micro-air vehicles. This work has included difficult near-wall measurements, flow visualization and careful analysis to describe the actions of the two control mechanisms.

Most interestingly, his group has found a dependence on Reynolds number that allowed the identification of fundamental frequencies important to the shear layer vortices. This improves control schemes for the devices. In addition to this, through a number of collaborations he has embarked on an experimental and numerical study of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. He has developed a unique well-validated particle image velocimetry dataset that is much larger than any previously available and has made this available as an open dataset. This work has recently been modeled with Large Eddy Simulation to fully characterize difficult to measure turbulent stresses and statistics.

Professor Sullivan was named fellow of the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering (CSME) in 2012. He completed his BSME and MSME from Clarkson University in 1988 and 1991 respectively, and PhD in Mechanical Engineering from Queen's University in 1995.
Yu Sun, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME, FEIC, FASME, FCAE, FIEEE, FAAAS

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Canada Research Chair in Micro and Nano Engineering Systems

Research: Robotics and automation at micro-nanometer scales; Precision instrumentation; MEMS and microfluidics; Cell mechanobiology; Experimental cell mechanics and nanomechanics; Manipulation and characterization of cells, molecules, and nanomaterials.

Laboratory: Advanced Micro and Nanosystems Laboratory (AMNL)

Email: sun@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-0549 | Office: MC419

Research Areas

  1. Biomedical Engineering
  2. Robotics, Mechatronics and Instrumentation

Biosketch

Yu Sun is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering (MIE) and is jointly appointed in the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of Toronto (U of T). He is the Canada Research Chair in Micro and Nano Engineering Systems. Professor Sun is a former Director of U of T’s central Nanofabrication Centre. He received his PhD degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Minnesota in 2003. His postdoc training was at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH-Zürich).

His Advanced Micro and Nanosystems Lab designs and constructs enabling micro and nanosystems (e.g., micro-nano robotic systems and MEMS/microfluidic devices) for automated operation at the micro and nanometer scales. The team manipulates, characterizes, and senses cells, molecules, and nanomaterials for both fundamental studies (e.g., mechanobiology, development biology, and nanomechanics) and clinical/industrial applications (IVF cell surgery, rare cell isolation, blood cell testing, drug screen, and precision instrumentation for industrial automation).

Sun is on the editorial boards of several IEEE Transactions, two Nature sponsored journals (Scientific Reports; Microsystems & Nanoengineering), and the IoP Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. He was the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Academic Early Career Award recipient in 2010 “for contributions to enabling microrobotic and MEMS technologies for automated cell manipulation and characterization in cell biology and clinical applications”. In 2013, he was awarded an NSERC E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellowship as one of the six awardees selected from across all fields of natural sciences and engineering across Canada. He was elected Fellow of CSME (Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering), EIC (Engineering Institute of Canada), AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science) ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), and CAE (Canadian Academy of Engineering) for his work on micro-nano devices and robotic systems.