Faculty

Dionne M. Aleman, PhD, P.Eng.

Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering

Research: Medical applications of operations research; radiotherapy treatment optimization, pandemic planning; data mining to improve bone marrow transplant outcomes; global optimization; heuristic design; parallel computing.

Laboratory: Medical Operations Research Lab (morLAB)

Email: aleman@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-6780 | Office: MC321

Research Areas

  1. Operations Research
  2. Biomedical Engineering

Biosketch

Dionne Aleman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto. She received her PhD in Industrial and Systems Engineering from the University of Florida (2007), MSc from the University of Florida (2006), and BSc from the University of Florida (2003).

Dr. Aleman's research interests are in the application of operations research to medical and healthcare systems. This research includes using mathematical optimization models to design radiation therapy treatment plans, using agent-based simulation to predict the spread of a pandemic disease in an urban population, using graph theory to determine vaccination priorities during a pandemic, and using optimization and simulation to improve hospital surgical scheduling. Dr. Aleman has held grants from NSERC, CFI, ORF, and NSF for her research. Within the Canadian Operational Research Society (CORS), she is the Vice President/President-Elect and a past Secretary of CORS Council, and the Secretary of the Health Care Operations Research Special Interest Group. Within the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS), she is the President of the Public Sector OR Section, and she is a past Chair of the Health Applications Society (HAS) and past President of the Junior Faculty Interest Group (JFIG). Dr. Aleman is also a Topical Editor for the Wiley Encyclopedia of Operations Research and Management Science, Associate Editor for IIE Transactions on Healthcare Systems Engineering, Associate Editor for the International Journal of Biomedical Data Mining, and Editorial Board Member of Operations Research in Health Care.
Cristina H. Amon, ScD, P.Eng., FAAAS, FASEE, FASME, FCAE, FCSME, FEIC, FIEEE, FRSC, NAE

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Dean, Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering
Alumni Chair in Bioengineering

Research: Fluid dynamics; nano scale thermal transport; energy systems; electronics cooling; hemodynamics and transport in biological systems; engineering design and education.

Laboratory: Advanced Thermal/fluid Optimization, Modelling and Simulation (ATOMS) Lab

Email: dean@ecf.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-3131 | Office: BA 2007

Research Areas

  1. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering
  2. Biomedical Engineering
  3. Energy and Environmental Engineering

Biosketch

Cristina Amon has been the Dean of the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and Alumni Professor of Bioengineering in Mechanical & Industrial Engineering since 2006. She received her Mechanical Engineering diploma from Simón Bolívar University, and her MS and ScD degrees in 1988 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Prior to her leadership at the University of Toronto, she was the Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor and Director of the Institute for Complex Engineered Systems at Carnegie Mellon University.

A pioneer in the development of Computational Fluid Dynamics for formulating thermal design solutions subject to multidisciplinary competing constraints, she conducts research in nanoscale thermal transport in semiconductors, energy systems and bioengineered devices.

Dean Amon serves on the BoD of MKS Instruments Inc., a leading global provider for advanced manufacturing of semiconductor devices, energy generation and electro-optical products. She is chair of the research committee of NCDEAS (National Council of Deans of Engineering and Applied Science), past chair of the Global Engineering Deans Council, and has served on advisory boards for several institutions including Stanford, UCLA, UIUC and Waterloo.

Cristina Amon has received numerous professional and leadership awards, including the ASME Gustus Larson Memorial Award, ASEE Westinghouse Medal, ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award, and the Society of Women Engineers' Achievement Award. In 2012 she was recognized as one of Canada's most Influential Women. She was inducted to four academies: Canadian Academy of Engineering, Spanish Royal Academy, Royal Society of Canada and the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. She is an elected fellow of all major professional societies in her field and has authored over 350 refereed articles in education and research literature.
Kamran Behdinan, PhD, P.Eng.

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
NSERC Chair in Multidisciplinary Engineering Design
Director, Institute for Multidisciplinary Design & Innovation (UT-IMDI)

Research: Design of lightweight airframe structures; characterization, modeling, and analysis of advanced materials and structures; MDO of aerospace/automotive systems; bridging FE-MD method for multi-scale modeling of solids; application of biofuel in aviation (material compatibility).

Laboratories:
Advanced Research Lab for Multifunctional Lightweight Structures (ARL-MLS)
Partners for the Advancement of Collaborative Engineering Education (PACE)

Email: behdinan@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-3631 | Office: MB 116

Research Areas

  1. Advanced Manufacturing and Materials Engineering
  2. Biomedical Engineering
  3. Applied Mechanics and Design

Biosketch

Professor Kamran Behdinan earned his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Victoria in British Columbia in 1996, and has considerable experience in both academic and industrial settings. Dr. Behdinan was appointed to the academic staff of Ryerson University in 1998, tenured and promoted to the level of associate professor in 2002 and subsequently to the level of Professor in 2007 and served as the director of the aerospace engineering program (2002-03), and the founding Chair of the newly established Department of Aerospace Engineering (2007-03 and 2007-11). He has joined the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, in the rank of Full Professor in September 2011. He is the NSERC Chair in Multidisciplinary Engineering Design, sponsored by NSERC, University of Toronto, and thirteen companies including Bomabardier, Pratt & Whitney Canada, Goodrich, Magna, Ford, and DRDC Toronto. He is the founding director of the Institute for Multidisciplinary Design & Innovation (UT-IMDI) an industry centred project-based learning institute in partnership with major aerospace and automotive companies.

Professor Behdinan is the past President of the Canadian Society of Mechanical Engineering (2010-2012), and served as a member of the technical and scholarship committees of the High Performance Computing Virtual Laboratory. He is the founding director and principal Advanced Research Laboratory for Multifunctional Lightweight Structures, funded by the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI) and Ontario Research Fund.

His research interests include design and development of light-weight structures for aerospace, automotive, and nuclear applications, multidisciplinary design optimization of aerospace and automotive systems, multi-scale simulation of nano-structured materials and composites at elevated temperature. He has supervised 17 PhDs, 60 Masters, and 9 postdoctoral fellows. He has also published more than 90 peer-reviewed journal papers and 140 conference papers, and 6 book chapters. He has been the recipient of many prestigious awards and recognitions such as the Research fellow of Pratt & Whitney Canada, fellow of the CSME, and the Ryerson FEAS research awards in 2004 and 2010.
Ridha Ben Mrad, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME

Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Mechatronics; precision design; smart materials; piezoceramics; thin film piezoelectrics; nonlinear and real-time control; microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and microfluidics.

Laboratory: Mechatronics and Microsystems Design (MMDL)

Email: rbenmrad@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-0689 | Office: MC224

Research Areas

  1. Robotics
  2. Mechatronics and Instrumentation
  3. Biomedical Engineering
  4. Applied Mechanics and Design

Biosketch

R. Ben Mrad, P.Eng., FCSME, is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto. He joined the University in 1997, having previously held research positions at the National Research Council of Canada in Vancouver, BC, and the Ford Research Laboratory in Dearborn, Michigan. He received a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 1994.

Professor Ben Mrad’s research interests are Mechatronics and Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) with a special focus on the design of pieozceramic actuators and sensors, microactuators and microfluidic systems, MEMS fabrication, thin film pieozoelectrics and development of smart materials based devices. His research led to a number of patents and inventions including 9 US patents/patent applications. He has supervised the research of over 55 graduate students and researchers, received the Faculty Early Career Teaching Award in 2002, and the Connaught Innovation Award in 2013 and 2015.

He serves on the NSERC Mechanical Engineering Grants Committee (2008-2011), chairs the IEEE Industrial Electronics Committee on MEMS and Nanotechnology, and serves on the Executive Board of the CanSmart Group. He is currently a Technical Editor of the IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, Editor of IE Tech News, and serves on the Steering Committee of the IEEE/ASME JMEMS. He was also a Guest Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics. He also served as a founding Director of the Institute for Robotics and Mechatronics at the University of Toronto (2009-11).
Beno Benhabib, PhD, P.Eng.

Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Design and mathematical analysis of modular and multi-arm robots; machine vision; robotic sensors; supervisory control of manufacturing systems; automatic quality control; computer aided design.

Laboratories:
Manufacturing Instrumentation & Virtual Manufacturing (MIVM) Laboratory
Computer Integrated Manufacturing Laboratory (CIMLab)

Email: benhabib@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-3447 | Office: MC417

Research Areas

  1. Applied Mechanics and Design
  2. Biomedical Engineering
  3. Robotics
  4. Mechatronics and Instrumentation
  5. Advanced Manufacturing and Materials Engineering

Biosketch

Beno Benhabib, P.Eng., joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Toronto in 1986, and is currently a Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering and in the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering. His research interests are in the area of design and control of intelligent autonomous systems. He is also a member of the NSERC Canadian Network for Research and Innovation in Machining Technology. His research in the past 25 years was supported by over 100 Masters and Doctoral Students, as well as a large number Postdoctoral Fellows and Research Engineers, with an overall funding level of almost $4M. Their combined effort has resulted in over 325 international journal and conference publications, as well as several book chapters. He is also the author of the book Manufacturing: Design, Production, Automation, and Integration.

Professor Benhabib serves as the Editor-at-Large, Americas, for the Journal of Intelligent and Robotic Systems, and as the Associate Editor for the Journal of Quality and Standards. He is also a member in the Canadian Council for Theory of Machines and Mechanisms, as well as in the Mechatronics Technical Committee, the International Federation of the Theory of Machines and Mechanisms.
Michael W. Carter, PhD, LEL, FCAE

Professor, Industrial Engineering

Research: Healthcare human resource planning and forecasting; capacity planning; operating room planning and scheduling; wait list management; healthcare system modelling; patient flow simulation; cancer screening capacity; clinic planning.

Email: mike.carter@utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-8661 | Office: RS311D

Research Areas

  1. Operations Research
  2. Biomedical Engineering

Biosketch

Michael Carter is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto (since 1981) and Director of the Centre for Research in Healthcare Engineering. He received his doctorate in Mathematics from the University of Waterloo in 1980. Since 1989, his research focus has been in the area of health care resource modeling with a variety of projects in hospitals, home care, rehab, long term care, medical labs and mental health institutions. He has supervised more than 160 engineering students in over 100 projects with healthcare institutions. He currently has 17 graduate students (7 doctoral, 10 masters) working in the area. He was the winner of the Annual Practice Prize from the Canadian Operational Research Society (CORS) four times (1988, 1992, 1996 and 2009). In 2000, he received the CORS Award of Merit for lifetime contributions to Canadian Operational Research. He also received an “Excellence in Teaching” Award from the University of Toronto Student Administrative Council. He is on the editorial board for the journals “Health Care Management Science”, “Operations Research for Healthcare”, “Health Systems” and “IIE Transactions on Healthcare Systems”. He is a member of the “Nursing Effectiveness, Utilization and Outcomes Research Unit” and a mentor in the “Health Care, Technology and Place” program at the University of Toronto. He is on the Advisory Board for the Regenstreif Centre for Healthcare Engineering at Purdue University, an Adjunct Scientist with the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Toronto and a member of the Faculty Advisory Council for the UofT Chapter of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). He is member of the Professional Engineers of Ontario. In 2012, he was inducted as a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering and in 2013, he was inducted as a Fellow of INFORMS, the international society for Operations Research and Management Science.

Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering
Canada Research Chair in Novel Optimization and Analytics in Health
Director, Centre for Healthcare Engineering (CHE)

Research: Operations research; optimization under uncertainty; mathematical programming; probabilistic analysis of systems; applications to radiation therapy; health care operations; sustainability; sports analytics.

Laboratories:
Applied Optimization Laboratory (AOL)
Centre for Research in Healthcare Engineering (CHE)

Email: tcychan@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-5721 | Office: MC315

Research Areas

  1. Operations Research
  2. Biomedical Engineering

Biosketch

Timothy Chan is the Canada Research Chair in Novel Optimization and Analytics in Health, an Associate Professor in the department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and the Director of the Centre for Healthcare Engineering at the University of Toronto. He received his BSc in Applied Mathematics from the University of British Columbia (2002), and his PhD in Operations Research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2007). Professor Chan was an Associate in the Chicago office of McKinsey and Company, a global management consulting firm (2007-2009). During that time, he advised leading companies in the fields of medical device technology, travel and hospitality, telecommunications, and energy on issues of strategy, organization, technology and operations.

Professor Chan’s primary research interests are in optimization under uncertainty and the application of optimization methods to problems in healthcare, medicine, global engineering, sustainability, and sports. He received the George B. Dantzig Dissertation Award from INFORMS (2007), an Early Researcher Award from the Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation of Ontario (2012), an Early Career Teaching Award from both the U of T Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (2012) and the U of T Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering (2013), second place in the INFORMS Section on Public Programs, Service and Needs best paper competition (2012), and first place in the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference research paper competition (2013). His research has been featured by the CBC, CTV News, the Toronto Star, and Canadian Business magazine.

Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Micro-scale robotics; bio-inspired design; magnetic actuation; dynamics and control; mobile robotics; manipulation; wireless actuation; non-invasive medical devices.

Laboratory: Microrobotics Laboratory

Email: ediller@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-1214 | Office: MC310

Research Areas

  1. Robotics
  2. Mechatronics and Instrumentation
  3. Biomedical Engineering
  4. Applied Mechanics and Design

Biosketch

Eric Diller received his BS and MS in Mechanical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH. He received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, where he continued as a postdoctoral researcher before joining the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering in 2014.

Dr. Diller’s work focuses on micro-scale robotics and bio-inspired novel locomotion systems, and features fabrication and control relating to remote actuation of micro-scale devices using magnetic fields, micro-scale robotic manipulation, smart materials, and swimming at low Reynolds number. He received first place in the NIST Mobile Microrobotics Microassembly Challenge in 2012 in St. Paul, MN and received the G. Sundback Graduate Fellowship at Carnegie Mellon University.

Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Wallace G. Chalmers Chair of Engineering Design

Research: Fluid flow and transport at small length scales; organized soft materials; microsystems design; micro and nanofabrication; fluidic microprocessors; high-throughput screening; small blood vessel structure and function.

Laboratory: Guenther Lab – Fluidic Microprocessors for Life & Material Sciences

Email: guenther@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-1282 | Office: MC416

Research Areas

  1. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering
  2. Advanced Manufacturing and Materials Engineering
  3. Biomedical Engineering

Biosketch

The Guenther Research Group draws from the areas of fluid mechanics, colloidal material synthesis, as well as micro/nanofabrication. We investigate fundamentals of transport processes associated with micro/nanoscale flows and aim at translating these fundamentals into unique and powerful technical solutions. We are particularly interested in realizing dynamically changing microenvironments for applications in materials science and biomedicine. Current applications include the controlled preparation of colloidal nanostructures in microreactors, high-throughput platforms for functional tests of small blood vessels with relevance to biopharmaceutical drug discovery, and microfluidic strategies for probing cellular decision processes.
David F. James, PhD, P.Eng.

Professor Emeritus, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Fluid mechanics; flow of non-Newtonian fluids; experimental and theoretical rheology; liquid elasticity; structure of complex fluids, from molecular to microscopic; friction reduction with polymer additives; microfluidics; biomechanics; physiological lubrication.

Laboratory: Rheology Laboratory

Email: david.james@utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-3049 | Office: MC307

Research Areas

  1. Biomedical Engineering

Biosketch

David F. James is currently Professor Emeritus of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, having joined the Department in 1967 after his PhD from the California Institute of Technology. He is still active in research and teaching. His research is related to fluid mechanics, especially the flow of complex liquids such as suspensions, solutions and pastes. His research interests include rheology, elastic liquids, non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, and his speciality is the fluid mechanics of polymeric liquids.

Professor James has received several teaching awards from the Department, and in 1984 he received the first Teaching Award given by the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering. He continues to be involved in teaching, as a Teaching Mentor for the Faculty, typically advising his junior colleagues.

Professor James’ research has been recognized through the 2011 Annual Award from the British Society of Rheology and the S.G. Mason Award from the Canadian Society of Rheology (2005), as well as through prestigious appointments at other universities, including the Chevron Visiting Professor at Caltech, the University Visiting Professor at Monash University, the Commonwealth Fellowship at St. John’s College and a Visiting Fellowship at Trinity College, both at the University of Cambridge.

His primary administrative service has been the Chair of the Division of Engineering Science at the University of Toronto (1991-95) and as the Secretary of the International Committee of Rheology (1988-2004).
Andreas Mandelis, PhD, LEL, FRSC, FCAE, FAAAS, FASME, FAPS, FSPIE

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Diffusion-Wave Sciences and Technologies
Director, CADIFT

Research: Thermal and optoelectronic non-destructive techniques (thermophysics and photovoltaics); biothermophotonic and biophotoacoustic imaging science and instrumentation; cancer, dental caries, bone and blood glucose diagnostics.

Laboratory: Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave and Photoacoustic Technologies (CADIPT)

Email: mandelis@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-5106 | Office: MC334

Research Areas

  1. Biomedical Engineering
  2. Advanced Manufacturing and Materials Engineering
  3. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering
  4. Energy and Environmental Engineering

Biosketch

Professor Andreas Mandelis is a Full Professor of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering; Electrical & Computer Engineering; and the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto. Dr. Mandelis’ fundamental research interests are focused on studies of physical processes in condensed and biological matter as they impact instrumentation science and signal generation. Examples are thermophysics, non-radiative and radiative physics of electronic, optical and biomedical materials, photoacoustic, photothermal and diffusion-wave phenomena in manufactured, electronic, biological and photonic media. Current interests include building theoretical and experimental system foundations of biothermophotonic and biophotoacoustic transport phenomena and frequency-domain instrumentation for imaging in hard (dental, bone) and soft tissues, novel biosensors and high-performance diagnostic imaging techniques. Culminating in his work on the foundations of the field of photoacoustic and diffusion waves in matter, his applied research interests span all aspects of instrumentation and measurement development for photoacoustic, photothermal, and diffusion-wave high-precision, high-dynamic-range analytical techniques leading to advanced non-destructive (non-invasive) inspection and monitoring technologies. Current application examples are in the fields of alternative energy conversion devices (e.g. solar cells, nano-optoelectronic devices), industrial manufactured products (steels, metal composites) and biomedical and dental diagnostics with major focus on advanced dynamic imaging instrumentation.

Professor Mandelis is the Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Diffusion-Wave Sciences and Technologies and a Fellow in the Academy of Sciences of The Royal Society of Canada. He has been selected for the Alexander von Humboldt Professor Award twice (in 2003 and 2012). He is the 2007 (inaugural) recipient of the Ontario Premier’s Discovery Award in Science and Engineering. He received the ASME 2009 Yeram Touloukian Award (and Medal) in Thermophysics, the Senior Prize of the International Photoacoustic and Photothermal Association, and the Canadian Association of Physicists (CAP) Medal for Outstanding Achievement in Industrial and Applied Physics. In 2010 he was awarded a Killam Research Fellowship from the Canada Council for the Arts. He is the recipient of the American Physical Society’s (APS) 2012 Joseph F. Keithley Award for Advances in Measurement Science and of the CAP-INO Medal for Outstanding Achievement in Applied Photonics. In 2013 he was selected as one of 10 recipients of the 2013 University of Toronto Inventors of the Year Award. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering, the APS, the SPIE, the AAAS and the ASME.
Hani Naguib, PhD, P.Eng., CEng, FIOM3, FASME, FSPE, FSPIE, FCSME

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Director, Toronto Institute for Advanced Manufacturing (TIAM), Associate Chair, Research

Research: Manufacturing emerging materials; advanced manufacturing; smart and active materials; nanostructured polymers and composites; metamaterials and bio-based materials. Smart sensors and actuators, energy management materials, batteries and supercapacitors, artificial muscles, smart textiles.

Laboratory: Smart Polymers and Composites Lab (SAPL)

Email: naguib@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-7054 | Office: RS207A

Research Areas

  1. Advanced Manufacturing and Materials Engineering
  2. Biomedical Engineering
  3. Applied Mechanics and Design

Biosketch

Hani Naguib is a Professor at the University of Toronto and director of the Toronto Institute for Advanced Manufacturing TIAM. His research scope encompasses the area of advanced materials and manufacturing, and enabling materials and technologies. His major expertise is in the area of smart and active materials; nanostructured polymers and composites; and bio-based materials. His group has applied these materials in a range of industrial and health care technologies such as smart sensors and actuators, energy management materials, batteries and supercapacitors, artificial muscles, smart textiles, biomedical and clinical devices. The main goal of his research program is to develop sustainable and transformational materials and manufacturing for the energy management, and health care sectors.

Naguib is the recipient of numerous honors and awards such as the Canada Research Chair, the Premier’s Early Research Award of Ontario, the Canada Foundation of Innovation, and the faculty Early Teaching Award. He is a Professional Engineer in Canada, a Chartered Engineer in U.K., a Fellow of the Institute of Materials Minerals and Mining IOM3 in UK, Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME, Fellow of the Society of Plastics Engineers SPE, Fellow of International Society of Optics and Photonics SPIE and Fellow of the Canadian Society of Mechanical Engineers CSME. He has been serving on the technical divisions’ board of directors for the SPE, ASME and CSME and has been organizing and chairing various conferences, symposia and seminars in national and international conferences. Naguib is the Associate Editor of the IOP Journal of Smart Materials, Journal of Cellular Plastics and Cellular Polymers.

In addition to his research, Naguib is active in teaching topics in Mechanical and Materials Engineering, he has developed both undergraduate and graduate curricula covering series of courses and labs including: Materials Science, Mechanics of Materials, Smart Materials and Structures, Macromolecular Materials, Composite Materials and Advanced Manufacturing. He has also served as the associate chair undergraduate studies for the department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto.
Goldie Nejat, PhD, P.Eng.

Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Canada Research Chair in Robots for Society
Director, Institute for Robotics & Mechatronics (IRM)

Research: Autonomous Systems; robotics and mechatronics; assistive devices; service robots/vehicles; robot-assisted emergency response; sensor agents; socially assistive robots; human-robot interaction.

Laboratory: Autonomous Systems and Biomechatronics (ASBLab)

Email: nejat@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-5033 | Office: MC418

Research Areas

  1. Robotics
  2. Mechatronics and Instrumentation
  3. Human Factors/Ergonomics
  4. Applied Mechanics and Design
  5. Advanced Manufacturing and Materials Engineering
  6. Biomedical Engineering

Biosketch

Goldie Nejat, PhD, P.Eng. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto, and the Founder and Director of the Autonomous Systems and Biomechatronics (ASBLab) Laboratory. Dr. Nejat is also an Adjunct Scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. She received both her BASc and PhD degrees in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Nejat is a world renowned expert in developing intelligent service/personal robots for applications in health, elderly care, emergency response, search and rescue, security and surveillance, and manufacturing. A major goal of her research is to develop and integrate intelligent socially assistive robots for assistive human-robot interactions (HRI) in healthcare facilities, private homes and for high stress and dangerous jobs. Dr. Nejat’s research is leading the development of intelligent assistive robotic aids that can meet the challenges posed by an aging population. She collaborates with international researchers, healthcare experts and healthcare facilities to develop robots and devices that can be effectively transferred and integrated into people’s everyday lives. Dr. Nejat is helping to change the face of robotics and her work is at the forefront of robotics research. Her research is constantly pushing the envelope of the capabilities of current robots.

In 2008, Dr. Nejat received an NSERC University Faculty Award. She also received the 2012 Professional Engineers of Ontario Young Engineer Medal and the 2013 Engineers Canada Young Engineer Achievement Award, both awards are for her exceptional achievements in the field of robotics at a young age.
A. Wilhelm Neumann, Dr.Rer.Nat.

Professor Emeritus, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Thermodynamics of contact angles, wetting and adhesion generalization of the classical theory of capillarity to high curvature situations; Applications of Digital Image Analysis and Processing to interfacial tension and other surface science problems; Modelling of cell and protein adhesion to synthetic and natural biomaterials; Applications of surface thermodynamics to biotechnological problems.

Laboratory: Applied Surface Thermodynamics (LAST) Laboratory

Email: neumann@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-3052 | Office: BA8131B

Research Areas

  1. Biomedical Engineering
  2. Energy and Environmental Engineering

Biosketch

Dr. Neumann has received his Dr.rer.nat in Chemical Physics, at University of Mainz, Germany in 1962, his habilitation in Physical Chemistry of Surfaces, at University of Stuttgart, Germany, 1972. He is currently Professor Emeritus of the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto.

During his career he has produced approximately 450 publications. His research interests include: Fundamental surface thermodynamic studies from both experimental and theoretical points of view, including: contact angle phenomena and surface energetic; Development of novel methodologies in applied surface thermodynamics: Application of image analysis and computer-aided techniques in measurements of surface thermodynamic properties such as surface tension, contact angle, and line tension; Applications of thermodynamics to process of biomedical relevance: Novel methodology for the energetic characterization of biosurfaces, most recently in lung physiology, specifically the role and function of lung surfactants.
Craig A. Simmons, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
U of T Distinguished Professor of Mechanobiology

Research: Cellular mechanobiology; cell, tissue and biomaterial micromechanics; design and application of microdevices that mimic complex physiological environments.

Laboratory: Simmons Lab for Cellular Mechanobiology

Email: simmons@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-0548 | Office: 661 University‎, 14th floor

Research Areas

  1. Applied Mechanics and Design
  2. Biomedical Engineering

Biosketch

Craig Simmons is the University of Toronto Distinguished Professor of Mechanobiology in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering. He also serves as the Scientific Director of the University of Toronto Translational Biology and Engineering Program in the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research.

Craig received his B.Sc. (Eng.) from the University of Guelph (1991), S.M. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1994), and Ph.D. from the University of Toronto (2000). He then completed an NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan (2000-2002) and an American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania (2002-2004) before returning to the University of Toronto faculty in 2005.

Craig leads a talented group of researchers and students to discover new treatments for heart valve, heart muscle, and blood vessel diseases, including strategies to regenerate cardiovascular tissues using stem cells and biomaterials. His group also creates novel microfluidic platforms to model vascularized tissues and organs for improved drug testing.

Craig was the Canada Research Chair in Mechanobiology from 2006-2016 and is the recipient of numerous research awards, including the Ontario Early Researcher Award, the McCharles Prize and McLean Award from the University of Toronto, and the 2015 CP Has Heart Cardiovascular Award from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. He has also been recognized for exceptional teaching by the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering with the 2009 Early Career Teaching Award, the 2015 Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Teaching Award, and the 2016 Faculty Teaching Award, and most recently with the 2017 Northrop Frye Award awarded by the University of Toronto for excellence in linking teaching and research.
David A. Steinman, PhD, P.Eng., FASME

Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Hemodynamic factors in cardiovascular disease; integration of medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD); simulation of medical imaging; flow visualization; intersection of science and engineering with the arts and humanities.

Laboratory: Biomedical Simulation Laboratory (BSL)

Email: steinman@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-7781 | Office: MC333

Research Areas

  1. Biomedical Engineering

Biosketch

Professor Steinman completed his doctoral studies in Computational Hemodynamics at the University of Toronto in 1993. From 1993-1996 he did postdoctoral work in Magnetic Resonance Imaging at the Robarts Research Institute in London, Ontario, after which he became a Robarts Scientist and Assistant then Associate Professor of Medical Biophysics and Diagnostic Radiology & Nuclear Medicine at the University of Western Ontario. In 2005 he returned to the University of Toronto, where he is currently a Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering and the Institute of Biomedical Engineering.

Professor Steinman is recognized as a pioneer in the integration of medical imaging and computational modelling, and their use in the study of cardiovascular disease development, diagnosis and treatment. His current research focuses on improving rupture risk prediction for cerebral aneurysms; elucidating the nature of turbulence in blood flow; developing an interactive ultrasound training simulator; and developing ‘art-inspired’ flow visualization techniques. He has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed journal articles and conference papers, and is the co-founder of the widely-used Vascular Modelling ToolKit. He was previously an Associate Editor for the ASME Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, and currently serves on the review boards of several international journals. He was Chair of the Fluids Committee for ASME's Bioengineering Division, and in 2012 was elected Fellow of the ASME. Continuously since 1998, Professor Steinman has been the recipient of competitive salary awards from the Heart & Stroke Foundation, and currently holds a Mid-Career Investigator Award.
Pierre E. Sullivan, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME

Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Turbulent flows; analytical models based on organized structures in steady and nonsteady flows; turbulent flow in spark ignition engines with laser doppler velocimetry; fibre slurries in high turbulence environments; development of improved PIV and PTV algorithms.

Laboratory: Turbulence Research Lab

Email: sullivan@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-3110 | Office: MC225

Research Areas

  1. Biomedical Engineering
  2. Energy and Environmental Engineering
  3. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering
  4. Applied Mechanics and Design

Biosketch

Professor Pierre Sullivan's research interests span flow phenomena, energy conservation and micro-scale electrohydrodynamics. His work has examined novel physical insight into the area of micro-scale jets and electrowetting on dielectric droplet motion. In aerodynamic control, was initiated with acoustic control leading to the current work installing synthetic jets directly onto the wing. This work is focused on low-speed (1-5 kW) wind turbines and micro-air vehicles. This work has included difficult near-wall measurements, flow visualization and careful analysis to describe the actions of the two control mechanisms.

Most interestingly, his group has found a dependence on Reynolds number that allowed the identification of fundamental frequencies important to the shear layer vortices. This improves control schemes for the devices. In addition to this, through a number of collaborations he has embarked on an experimental and numerical study of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. He has developed a unique well-validated particle image velocimetry dataset that is much larger than any previously available and has made this available as an open dataset. This work has recently been modeled with Large Eddy Simulation to fully characterize difficult to measure turbulent stresses and statistics.

Professor Sullivan was named fellow of the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering (CSME) in 2012. He completed his BSME and MSME from Clarkson University in 1988 and 1991 respectively, and PhD in Mechanical Engineering from Queen's University in 1995.
Yu Sun, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME, FEIC, FASME, FCAE, FIEEE, FAAAS

Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Canada Research Chair in Micro and Nano Engineering Systems

Research: Robotics and automation at micro-nanometer scales; Precision instrumentation; MEMS and microfluidics; Cell mechanobiology; Experimental cell mechanics and nanomechanics; Manipulation and characterization of cells, molecules, and nanomaterials.

Laboratory: Advanced Micro and Nanosystems Laboratory (AMNL)

Email: sun@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-946-0549 | Office: MC419

Research Areas

  1. Robotics
  2. Mechatronics and Instrumentation
  3. Biomedical Engineering

Biosketch

Yu Sun is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering (MIE) and is jointly appointed in the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of Toronto (U of T). He is the Canada Research Chair in Micro and Nano Engineering Systems. Professor Sun is a former Director of U of T’s central Nanofabrication Centre. He received his PhD degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Minnesota in 2003. His postdoc training was at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH-Zürich).

His Advanced Micro and Nanosystems Lab designs and constructs enabling micro and nanosystems (e.g., micro-nano robotic systems and MEMS/microfluidic devices) for automated operation at the micro and nanometer scales. The team manipulates, characterizes, and senses cells, molecules, and nanomaterials for both fundamental studies (e.g., mechanobiology, development biology, and nanomechanics) and clinical/industrial applications (IVF cell surgery, rare cell isolation, blood cell testing, drug screen, and precision instrumentation for industrial automation).

Sun is on the editorial boards of several IEEE Transactions, two Nature sponsored journals (Scientific Reports; Microsystems & Nanoengineering), and the IoP Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. He was the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Academic Early Career Award recipient in 2010 “for contributions to enabling microrobotic and MEMS technologies for automated cell manipulation and characterization in cell biology and clinical applications”. In 2013, he was awarded an NSERC E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellowship as one of the six awardees selected from across all fields of natural sciences and engineering across Canada. He was elected Fellow of CSME (Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering), EIC (Engineering Institute of Canada), AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science) ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), and CAE (Canadian Academy of Engineering) for his work on micro-nano devices and robotic systems.
Lidan You, PhD, P.Eng., FCSME

Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Muscular skeletal biomechanics; bone cell mechanobiology; bone tissue engineering; bone modelling and remodelling; advanced microfluidics system for bone cell mechanotransduction study; osteoporosis prevention and treatment; and bone regeneration.

Laboratory: Cellular Biomechanics Laboratory (CBL)

Email: youlidan@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-5736 | Office: MC316

Research Areas

  1. Biomedical Engineering

Biosketch

Lidan You is an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto with cross-appointments in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering (MIE) and the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME). She received her PhD degree in mechanical engineering from the City University of New York in 2002. Dr. You continued her postdoc training at Stanford University before she joined the University of Toronto as a faculty member in 2006.

Dr. You received the Early Researcher Award from the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation in 2009 and the Duggan Medal from Canadian Society of Mechanical Engineering (CSME) in 2011. She is a registered Professional Engineer in Ontario, and a member of the Orthopedics Research Society, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Canadian Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Biomedical Engineering Society, and the American Society of Bone and Mineral Research.

Dr. You is the director of Cellular Biomechanics Laboratory at U of T. Her research is focused on solving biomechanical questions in muscular skeletal system at the cellular level. In specific, her team is working on the anti-resorptive effect of mechanical loading on bone tissue; pressure effect on bone cell mechanotransduction; osteogenic potential of high frequency low magnitude vibration on bone adaptation; angiogenesis involvement in initiation of bone resorption under disuse condition; the advanced microfluidic system for bone cell mechanotransduction study; the role of focal adhesion assembly in cell mechanosensitivity using micropatterned surface; and the development of advanced artificial bone matrix by employing novel microfabrication technologies.
Edmond Young, PhD. P.Eng.

Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering

Research: Microfluidics; biofluid mechanics; microscale cell-based systems; cellular microenvironments; microfabrication; cell biology; cell imaging and microscopy; biomedical engineering; and cancer.

Laboratory: Integrative Biology and Microengineered Technologies Laboratory (IBMT)

Email: eyoung@mie.utoronto.ca | Tel: 416-978-1521 | Office: MC313

Research Areas

  1. Biomedical Engineering
  2. Thermal and Fluid Sciences Engineering

Biosketch

Edmond W.K. Young joined the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto as an Assistant Professor in January 2013. He received his BASc (2001) and MASc (2003) in Mechanical Engineering at the University of British Columbia, and his PhD in Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto (2008). He was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 2009 to 2012, working at the Wisconsin Institute for Medical Research (WIMR).

Professor Young’s research interests focus on the development of microscale technologies for cell biology applications, with emphasis on creating engineered models that mimic the cell and tissue microenvironments in both healthy and diseased animals. This interdisciplinary research area requires combining the principles and techniques of microfabrication, fluid mechanics, material science, cell biology, and cell imaging and microscopy. In 2009, he received the Governor General’s Gold Medal and the Norman F. Moody Award for academic excellence, and in 2015 was awarded the CIHR-ICR CCRDP New PI Award.”